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Define the perfect MMORPG.

22 posts

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I’ve lived through RPGs and MMORPGs, from FF VII to WoW. These days I don’t play any MMORPG because I am unstimulated by the lack of manual influenceable combat. I want action, so I play shooting games with RPG elements, such as Contract Wars.

I’ve always wondered, what would be the perfect MMORPG, is it possible to please everyone just be adding everything, and what games do you think have come close to perfect in MMORPG market, either on Kongregate or Console?

 
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Like Fallout 3 or New Vegas. But VATS can’t be used against other players and when used against NPCs it doesn’t stop time

Available on both PC and console

 
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Originally posted by WloJTqpCTolW:

is it possible to please everyone just be adding everything

In short, no. There is a point when having too much content and too many options overwhelms players. Complexity intrigues some people, but it’s a huge turnoff to others. That’s why some incredibly simplistic games (Angry Birds, anyone?) manage to remain popular. Video game production was once considered a niche industry. Now the industry is mainstream, but the audience is still splintered enough to maintain several niche markets. While it’s very possible to attract customers from several niches, probably the most reliable approach is to focus on attributes that will appeal very strongly to a few niches rather than toss a token feature to each known niche.

 
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(This thread doesn’t belong in this forum section)

I think a perfect MMORPG really depends on the community. The community of a game really makes it or breaks it. But overall I would say a relatively massive world is a must. Regular content updates and expansions. No P2P content if possible. Trying to avoid repetitiveness and overly unnecessary farming all of the time.

In short, no. There is a point when having too much content and too many options overwhelms players. Complexity intrigues some people, but it’s a huge turnoff to others. That’s why some incredibly simplistic games (Angry Birds, anyone?) manage to remain popular. Video game production was once considered a niche industry. Now the industry is mainstream, but the audience is still splintered enough to maintain several niche markets. While it’s very possible to attract customers from several niches, probably the most reliable approach is to focus on attributes that will appeal very strongly to a few niches rather than toss a token feature to each known niche.

I realize this wasn’t in response to me, but I just have a few points I’d think should be said.

Most people who play MMORPG’s aren’t looking for something simple, mindless, and requiring little skill like ‘Angry Birds’. Angry Birds was originally a mobile game project directed at the casual gaming market. MMORPG’s are typically geared toward more serious gamers who want to spend massive amounts of time committing to them and enjoying them. As addicting as Angry Birds is, it doesn’t quite fit the same criteria of judgement as an MMORPG.

That aside, there is a HUGE difference between a game being complex and a game having a lot of content. There can be simple games with a lot of content, just like there can be complex games with very little content. The complexity really depends on how the user interacts with the game as well as a few other factors such as the learning curve and general skill required to play the game. I don’t think complex games really appeal to the masses, but games with massive amounts of content certainly do. You really can’t go wrong with having a game you can go back to for weeks and still have something new to do.

 
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Originally posted by Hokage4354:

I realize this wasn’t in response to me, but I just have a few points I’d think should be said.

Most people who play MMORPG’s aren’t looking for something simple, mindless, and requiring little skill like ‘Angry Birds’. Angry Birds was originally a mobile game project directed at the casual gaming market. MMORPG’s are typically geared toward more serious gamers who want to spend massive amounts of time committing to them and enjoying them. As addicting as Angry Birds is, it doesn’t quite fit the same criteria of judgement as an MMORPG.

I realize Angry Birds isn’t geared toward the MMORPG niche, but my point still stands. I moderated two MMORPGs for 2 1/2 years, and in my opinion those games were extremely laid back for MMORPGs. They still managed to have a large number of players complaining about them being “too difficult” or “too complex.” People gave up on the second one before even figuring out the beginning quests (which consisted of running around and picking things up) because they were confused. The players who did stick around in these MMORPGs were largely not the same players who would play EverQuest, World of Warcraft, Lineage, or any other large-scale production MMORPG (I met less than 20 players in those 2 1/2 years who had any EQ experience).

In other words, even within the MMORPG niche, there are smaller niches. There is no catch-all appeal for it. Just because some MMORPG aficionados are “hardcore” gamers doesn’t mean that the MMORPG fanatics who prefer less effort in their games are any less MMORPG players. They’re all MMORPG players, but they just have different interests in the games.

 
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-It’s F2P
-Everything is obtainable without spending real money.
-Requires less grinding
-Fun combat system (balance between key spam and pilot mode fighting)
-Vast world
-Actual fun objectives unlike kill x to get y

 
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Games are made by businesses. Development time costs money. So say you are buildng an “MMO with teh everything!”. Great idea. Now lets look closer. Given that any given feature, say “mortal kombat like melee” is only going to appeal to 5% of the target audience, is that really a good investment of your development dollars? As opposed to say spending that money developing content that will appeal to 95% of your players? It’s a simple economic choice. Businesses (and even more so indie developers) have limited time and money to develop a game. It is a waste of both to focus on a game play mechanic that doesn’t appeal to your core audience.

If you are looking to play an arcade shooter, do you really want farmville style mechanics for gathering money to upgrade your ship? Or do you just want to blast the crap outta things (because thats why you play arcade shooters) and be rewarded with resources for blasting the crap outta things?

Making games is a lot more complicated than just putting together a wish-list of game mechanics.

 
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OP is talking about MMORPG. The suggestions people are posting are gameplay valued by majority of the people anyway.

Nothing is perfect in the world, but something can be good enough to please the most people possible.

 
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OP specifically asked if it was a good idea to throw everything into an MMO and call it done. Our answers are relevant.

Short version: no, you can’t make a game everyone likes
Long version: if you want to double your development time / cost by working on something that only a fraction of your players will like, you can. If you want to take that same time / cost and work on something that a majority of your players will like, it’s probably a better idea.

 
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Originally posted by CowFriend:

OP is talking about MMORPG. The suggestions people are posting are gameplay valued by majority of the people anyway.

Nothing is perfect in the world, but something can be good enough to please the most people possible.

Don’t forget that just because people generally like a feature doesn’t mean that they will always like that feature. While I like RPGs, shooters, and puzzles, I don’t necessarily want all that crammed into one game.

 
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Oh, my bad. I forgot to read the OP.

New answer is no.

 
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Originally posted by CowFriend:

Oh, my bad. I forgot to read the OP.

New answer is no.

People tend to do that a lot.

 
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The perfect MMORPG exist here in Kong. It’s Wartune!!!

 
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Complexity intrigues some people, but it’s a huge turnoff to others.

Isn’t the solution simply to offer options as to what you want and don’t want, through different realms or servers?

But overall I would say a relatively massive world is a must.

A massive world must have massive amounts of content everywhere. It’s okay having a big world, but if you’re having to manually travel over terrain it becomes unnecessarily repetitive.

-Requires less grinding

Grinding is fun if the key element of the game is fun. This is why Diablo 2 is my favourite MMORPG for me because I enjoyed the actual combat, leveling and getting items was the secondary enjoyment.

And to clarify what this “OP” is asking.

What do you think would make the perfect MMORPG “for you”.

 
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Tera battle system and graphics, with Runescape style quests and skills (but hopefully not as monotonous) I guess. I have a feeling TES Online will be similar to this.

 
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Originally posted by WloJTqpCTolW:

What do you think would make the perfect MMORPG “for you”.


Originally posted by WloJTqpCTolW:

Complexity intrigues some people, but it’s a huge turnoff to others.

Isn’t the solution simply to offer options as to what you want and don’t want, through different realms or servers?


Nope. If I’m in a persistent MMO (rather than one with resetting stats), I prefer to be playing the same game as everyone else. Having separate servers for PVP/RP is one thing, but having a separate server for PvE elements is not appealing. Besides, to give everyone a server with the exact features he wants (no more, no less) would require you to almost have a separate server for every player.
 
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Something more skill-based than the norm.

I’d love an MMO with Dwarf Fortress-style graphics and ridiculous difficulty with little playability until enough practice is obtained to be able to function.

 
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Grinding is fun if the key element of the game is fun.

Keyword: Less

There’s no doubt that you should be taking some time if you want to complete a rewarding objective, but you shouldn’t be spending five hours killing the same thing over and over again. I do not think that grinding is something that’s needed in a game for it to be enjoyable.

 
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The perfect MMO should have a tutorial that allows the player to experience the intricacies of the game without being in a multiplayer situation.

I don’t want to be thrown into the middle of a real-time multiplayer environment without knowing what I’m supposed to be doing. That is the surest way to get me to not play a game, because other players will hammer you for not cooperating (or quickly take advantage of your inexperience in competition), and “I’m a new player, I don’t know what I’m doing” isn’t an excuse.

The perfect MMO would also have some element of unpredictability (read: luck) and variety that keeps the player on their feet and always wanting to come back. If I already know what’s going to happen next, why should I even bother playing?

The perfect MMO would also make it so that players would only be interacting with other players who were at or near their level of skill and experience. This is somewhat related to the first point, but new players shouldn’t be intimidated by going up against someone with tons of experience, and veteran players shouldn’t have to be bothered by attempting to explain a game to someone who’s just starting out.

Finally (and this may seem contradictory), the perfect MMO should be such that it is possible to play the game alone. Certainly, MMOs should encourage cooperation, competition, and interaction among its players. But it should always be possible (not necessarily as easy, but possible) to advance in an MMO without depending on others. This is particularly important in MMOs that receive badges. All MMOs have a definite lifespan, but badges last indefinitely. An isolated person in 2023 playing Generic MMO X that is released in 2013 should be just as able to earn the badges as someone playing the MMO today, when it first comes out.

 
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There isn’t a way to please everyone, but bothering to be a game instead of slapping together obstructive mechanics and panhandling the player to bypass them with real money is a great place to start.

 
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To make a better MMORPG, take the second M out of it.

 
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Originally posted by jim_vierling:

To make a better MMORPG, take the second M out of it.

Massively Online Role Playing Game?
/flee