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Flag Post
Originally posted by TheGoldenHammer:
Originally posted by Apostrophe:

What would you reccomend for someone who is a skinnyfat (person with low weight, high bodyfat, low body mass)?

Bulk and put on lean body badd, or cut to around 16% bodyfat and then bulk?

That depends entirely on your goals

Appearance
Health
Fitness
Strength
Therapeutic
Other

Speaking of which, what are they?

All of the above.

More focused on appearance and health though.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by TheGoldenHammer:
Originally posted by dezpah:

Damn TGH you’re a beast. By chance I stumbled upon this site and checked out this thread, registered just so I could come in here to ask you a few things if you don’t mind haha.

Your English is superb, how come?

“I was on the national teams for both Wrestling and Gymnastics, and eventually powerlifting for a short time.”
- How could you be so good at gymnastics at such a high bodyweight? You were on the Russian national team for wrestling, just wow, ever trained with someone like… maybe Musulbes?

What sort of powerlifting routines are popular in Russia? It’s only stuff like smolov/sheiko that’s known on the USA forums. I also happen to know a few others, though it’s just some basic “templates” by for example Albert Fomin/Sergey Ivanov. Is there some sort of routine, or some basic training principles/approaches that you would recommend?

Just a lot of practice and reinforced equipment. I did a lot of Rings and Pommel Horse, and a little Floor Tumbling. I quit very early on though, only about a year or so in.Still, I did qualify and make the team and it looks good on a resume, so I like to include it.

Wrestling’s an entirely different story, though. I was four-time champion in the heaviest weight class in Serbia and one-time European Champion for my weight class. I’ve never trained with Musulbes, but I have met him. A great, stout guy. I’ve also met other inspirationals like Karelin, Emelianenko or Valuev.

As for powerlifting routines here in Russia? it’s back and forth, kind of like in America. A common difference I come across, though, is leniency towards heavier weight and fewer reps in comparison to how things run in the US. I strictly believe in necessity being the key to true strength and power. If you build the obstacle, your body will overcome it through time, training and hard work. Something I have my guys do for developing functional strength for powerlifting is this template routine, which can be turned into a drop-set once a week.

( * stands for “sets of”, I.E 2*4 2 sets of 4 reps)

2*4 @ 40%
2*4 @ 50%
2*4 @ 60%
2*2 @ 75%
4*2 @ 80%
4*1 @ 85/90%

Which can be applied to squat, deadlift, bench press, etc. Once you’ve overcome 90+% of your 1RM, you’re allowed to turn it into a drop-set and do the whole list backwards that same day. I only have them do it once a week, though. The majority of the rest of our workouts are geared towards functional body strength workouts and compound lifts/drills, like

Burpee/Clean & Jerk combination
Atlas Stones
Tire Flipping
Obstacle Courses
Conan’s Wheel
Various drills/exercises I’ve come up with that would really be safer shown than described
And a bunch of other stuff, : )

Don’t let your body forget what it’s limits are – keep them close in your workouts, and constantly defy and challenge them. And do not forget to rest well!

Thanks a lot for the reply!

So you and your guys basically do that scheme on the competition lifts, and besides that most of your training is based around whole body stuff.
A few questions again, if you don’t mind – what sort of reps do you use on the other exercises? Do you do them at higher reps mainly, or low reps too? I have no access to any strongman equipment and can’t do clean and jerk (not allowed in the gym), by what principle do you choose the exercises used besides the powerlifts? Are there some that you would recommend?

Latly, a bit different question – what if someone is not a competitive powerlifter, but only strength trains to get stronger for their sport (grappling,bjj,athletics, etc.) – do you even see much importance to do the squat/bench/deadlift at low reps? It seems to me that keeping at least some exercise, where you will do low reps should be good, so that you can objectively judge your progress and see how things are going.

Thanks again for your reply :)

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by dezpah:
Originally posted by TheGoldenHammer:
Originally posted by dezpah:

Damn TGH you’re a beast. By chance I stumbled upon this site and checked out this thread, registered just so I could come in here to ask you a few things if you don’t mind haha.

Your English is superb, how come?

“I was on the national teams for both Wrestling and Gymnastics, and eventually powerlifting for a short time.”
- How could you be so good at gymnastics at such a high bodyweight? You were on the Russian national team for wrestling, just wow, ever trained with someone like… maybe Musulbes?

What sort of powerlifting routines are popular in Russia? It’s only stuff like smolov/sheiko that’s known on the USA forums. I also happen to know a few others, though it’s just some basic “templates” by for example Albert Fomin/Sergey Ivanov. Is there some sort of routine, or some basic training principles/approaches that you would recommend?

Just a lot of practice and reinforced equipment. I did a lot of Rings and Pommel Horse, and a little Floor Tumbling. I quit very early on though, only about a year or so in.Still, I did qualify and make the team and it looks good on a resume, so I like to include it.

Wrestling’s an entirely different story, though. I was four-time champion in the heaviest weight class in Serbia and one-time European Champion for my weight class. I’ve never trained with Musulbes, but I have met him. A great, stout guy. I’ve also met other inspirationals like Karelin, Emelianenko or Valuev.

As for powerlifting routines here in Russia? it’s back and forth, kind of like in America. A common difference I come across, though, is leniency towards heavier weight and fewer reps in comparison to how things run in the US. I strictly believe in necessity being the key to true strength and power. If you build the obstacle, your body will overcome it through time, training and hard work. Something I have my guys do for developing functional strength for powerlifting is this template routine, which can be turned into a drop-set once a week.

( * stands for “sets of”, I.E 2*4 2 sets of 4 reps)

2*4 @ 40%
2*4 @ 50%
2*4 @ 60%
2*2 @ 75%
4*2 @ 80%
4*1 @ 85/90%

Which can be applied to squat, deadlift, bench press, etc. Once you’ve overcome 90+% of your 1RM, you’re allowed to turn it into a drop-set and do the whole list backwards that same day. I only have them do it once a week, though. The majority of the rest of our workouts are geared towards functional body strength workouts and compound lifts/drills, like

Burpee/Clean & Jerk combination
Atlas Stones
Tire Flipping
Obstacle Courses
Conan’s Wheel
Various drills/exercises I’ve come up with that would really be safer shown than described
And a bunch of other stuff, : )

Don’t let your body forget what it’s limits are – keep them close in your workouts, and constantly defy and challenge them. And do not forget to rest well!

Thanks a lot for the reply!

So you and your guys basically do that scheme on the competition lifts, and besides that most of your training is based around whole body stuff.
A few questions again, if you don’t mind – what sort of reps do you use on the other exercises? Do you do them at higher reps mainly, or low reps too? I have no access to any strongman equipment and can’t do clean and jerk (not allowed in the gym), by what principle do you choose the exercises used besides the powerlifts? Are there some that you would recommend?

Latly, a bit different question – what if someone is not a competitive powerlifter, but only strength trains to get stronger for their sport (grappling,bjj,athletics, etc.) – do you even see much importance to do the squat/bench/deadlift at low reps? It seems to me that keeping at least some exercise, where you will do low reps should be good, so that you can objectively judge your progress and see how things are going.

Thanks again for your reply :)

As to be expected, the form & speed shifts and changes depending on the exercise, but for the majority of them we follow a “slow descent, explosive ascension” methodology. In example, in bench pressing, you lower the weight to your chest slowly and controlled, and then explode your body into the lift (again, CONTROLLED. Don’t try this without proper training)

We also have high-rep days too, but mostly for slow-twitch muscle fiber development and cardio. And one of my most basic and consistent principles in my gyms is Use your body as a single unit. There’s more involved in a squat than just your knees, more involved in bench pressing than just your chest, and more involved in deadlifting than just your back. If you don’t train, and USE your body as a single unit when lifting, chances are you’ve not reached your full potential yet.

Also, I highly recommend weight training/strength training to get stronger for sports like MMA, BJJ, grappling, etc. I competed for 10 years in both Combat Sambo and Judo, and still teach Self-Defense judo from time to time as a fourth degree (yodan). Also, yes, there is great importance in low-reps @ higher weight for deadlift and squat, and almost any lift (for strength anyway). Your body is designed to overcome obstacles – your brain, your muscularity, your organs, etc. You’re made to adapt – by consistently creating obstacles and consistently keeping your body well-fed and well managed with rest, relaxation and hard work, you can very quickly develop great strength gains.

Believe it or not, it wasn’t until recently that I was the biggest guy around whenever I’d go to meets and what-not. But I’ve always, for as long as I can remember, been one of, and lately, the strongest and fastest.

Even though size is important, it’s not as important as functional strength, muscle memory and health. Now that I’m much older, the size has become a bi-product of the strength training. It will come, but only with time and hard work. In the meantime, I enjoyed not having to worry about these massive giants who towered over me, rippled with muscle and veins and borderline unnatural genetics, for the confidence and ability I held in my own athleticism.

Hope some of this helps, I don’t make posts like this often. :)

 
Flag Post

Spent a solid 12 hours over the past two days painting my bedroom. Big room, lots of trim and fancy shit, paneled walls, had to keep moving furniture. So sore and tired, it’s unbelievable. I was totally doing the Karate Kid type stuff, haha. I was so sweaty I changed my shirt a couple of times. Best workout I’ve had in months.

Also, a couple of days of strong sun and my pool has gotten to a nice comfortable temp. Need to buy a new swim tether (or some rubber hosing and a belt.. lol) so I can get in swim cardio days.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by diabolotry:

Spent a solid 12 hours over the past two days painting my bedroom. Big room, lots of trim and fancy shit, paneled walls, had to keep moving furniture. So sore and tired, it’s unbelievable. I was totally doing the Karate Kid type stuff, haha. I was so sweaty I changed my shirt a couple of times. Best workout I’ve had in months.

Also, a couple of days of strong sun and my pool has gotten to a nice comfortable temp. Need to buy a new swim tether (or some rubber hosing and a belt.. lol) so I can get in swim cardio days.

I hear that! My pools need management too, lol. Glad to hear you’re still making progress! Stay strong!

Unrelated competition photo, =P

 
Flag Post

So tried out my max today on bench and it’s at 160, I know I’m going to feel that weight tomorrow. Ate some bananas to keep the soreness down and lots of peanut butter for protein. Yum.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Indy111:

So tried out my max today on bench and it’s at 160, I know I’m going to feel that weight tomorrow. Ate some bananas to keep the soreness down and lots of peanut butter for protein. Yum.

Good movement! Keep going strong, man. Glad to hear you’re getting back into it!

 
Flag Post

Hammer how do I stop being shaky when working with free weights?

Also, how do I do barbell bent over rows without looking like a dumbass? My gym’s barbells are all either in the power rack or bench.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by ZamTambien:

Hammer how do I stop being shaky when working with free weights?

Also, how do I do barbell bent over rows without looking like a dumbass? My gym’s barbells are all either in the power rack or bench.

Being shaky means you’re doing it right. I bench over 700 as a 1RM, and over 600 as a 5RM, and I still shake when benching even 200. At least a little bit of shaking is good – it means you’re doing it properly. Squeezing and flexing inevitably ends up with shaking, especially when working with weights. But you can reduce it through

Practice
Growing stronger
Breathing a little deeper
Squeezing in your pectorals.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaw-Up9Fkcg

As to the rows, provided you’re doing them right, it’s kinda hard. Everyone looks at least a little silly doing bent over barbell rows. Just make sure you’re doing them right: Slow, controlled with proper spine positioning.

 
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LOL WHAT THE FUCK IS HEALTH AND FITNESS

 
Flag Post

Hey dudes, I just did twenty push ups, and it only took me two sets to accomplish.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by KingOfTheLULZ:

LOL WHAT THE FUCK IS HEALTH AND FITNESS

First thing I noticed was the Cheez-its. Which are amazing. They’re the only ‘junk food’ I regularly gorge on, lol.

Originally posted by Cizinec:

Hey dudes, I just did twenty push ups, and it only took me two sets to accomplish.

Keep it up, dude. I recently did my daily 300 reps with a dinner spoon (to my mouth) myself, keep up the good movement!

 
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This is not good to take such things. The original body and fitness can be gained by genuine workout only. Take synthol to have a long workout make us addicted to it. We should avoid these things.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by jonny_m:

This is not good to take such things. The original body and fitness can be gained by genuine workout only. Take synthol to have a long workout make us addicted to it. We should avoid these things.

Definitely good advice. : ) By the way, is English your first language? If you don’t mind me asking.

 
Flag Post

Any tips on exercises which would allow me to get up from a lying down position to standing position? I’m asking because that’s kinda my trademark in fighting.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Lei_Wulong:

Any tips on exercises which would allow me to get up from a lying down position to standing a standing position. I’m asking because that’s kinda my trademark in fighting.

You mean kip-ups?

The most difficult thing about them is getting the technique down. I remember that I leaned it by watching one in “Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story” again and again, going frame by frame to break down the individual steps. You need a bit of strength in your rump, especially the stomach, to pull it off (sit-ups, crunches etc.), but I was a skinny white kid back then. It’s all about the technique really:

  • lie on your back
  • roll your legs up (as if you wanted to bring your knees to your shoulders) to create tension, like a pulled bow in archery. The legs can be bent or straight. bent is usually easier (at least for me).
  • place your hands next to your ears
  • kick your legs out and release that tension
  • additionally push yourself up with your hands. This will help you to bring your upper body upright. When you’re better you might ot need the hands anymore.
  • Finally bring your feet under your body.

Most of the tutorials on YouTube break it down nicely.

 
Flag Post

Nah, I actually know how to do the kip up, I’ve thought more of a traditional stand up move, I dunno how to call it.

 
Flag Post

Maybe this one?
I don’t really see how this would be superior to simply getting up. Seems to me like one of these useless stylisations.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Lei_Wulong:

Any tips on exercises which would allow me to get up from a lying down position to standing position? I’m asking because that’s kinda my trademark in fighting.

Techniques like this require a lot of hip, rotator cuff and spinal flexibility – as well as a fair amount of fast-twitch training. Since it’s not the kip-up, what exactly do you have in mind?

If you can be a little more specific on the style you want to get up in, though, I might be able to help a little more. I’d personally suggest just doing a backward roll to your feet.

 
Flag Post

Done working out, but I won’t have food done for 35 minutes! Is that bad? How long can you actually go without food after lifting before “bad” stuff happens. (Like the lifting meant nothing)

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Indy111:

Done working out, but I won’t have food done for 35 minutes! Is that bad? How long can you actually go without food after lifting before “bad” stuff happens. (Like the lifting meant nothing)

You’re fine. Ideally, you want to eat half an hour after your workout – so the nutrients in whatever you ate can get to work immediately. But I’d say you’ll be fine as long as you eat well within the next two to three hours.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by TheGoldenHammer:

As to be expected, the form & speed shifts and changes depending on the exercise, but for the majority of them we follow a “slow descent, explosive ascension” methodology. In example, in bench pressing, you lower the weight to your chest slowly and controlled, and then explode your body into the lift (again, CONTROLLED. Don’t try this without proper training)

We also have high-rep days too, but mostly for slow-twitch muscle fiber development and cardio. And one of my most basic and consistent principles in my gyms is Use your body as a single unit. There’s more involved in a squat than just your knees, more involved in bench pressing than just your chest, and more involved in deadlifting than just your back. If you don’t train, and USE your body as a single unit when lifting, chances are you’ve not reached your full potential yet.

Also, I highly recommend weight training/strength training to get stronger for sports like MMA, BJJ, grappling, etc. I competed for 10 years in both Combat Sambo and Judo, and still teach Self-Defense judo from time to time as a fourth degree (yodan). Also, yes, there is great importance in low-reps @ higher weight for deadlift and squat, and almost any lift (for strength anyway). Your body is designed to overcome obstacles – your brain, your muscularity, your organs, etc. You’re made to adapt – by consistently creating obstacles and consistently keeping your body well-fed and well managed with rest, relaxation and hard work, you can very quickly develop great strength gains.

Believe it or not, it wasn’t until recently that I was the biggest guy around whenever I’d go to meets and what-not. But I’ve always, for as long as I can remember, been one of, and lately, the strongest and fastest.

Even though size is important, it’s not as important as functional strength, muscle memory and health. Now that I’m much older, the size has become a bi-product of the strength training. It will come, but only with time and hard work. In the meantime, I enjoyed not having to worry about these massive giants who towered over me, rippled with muscle and veins and borderline unnatural genetics, for the confidence and ability I held in my own athleticism.

Hope some of this helps, I don’t make posts like this often. :)

Thanks again for the reply TGH !

 
Flag Post

I’ve lost 30pounds in the last year according to my yearly checkup…
And to believe I’ve only started trying in the last month.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by TheGoldenHammer:
Originally posted by Lei_Wulong:

Any tips on exercises which would allow me to get up from a lying down position to standing position? I’m asking because that’s kinda my trademark in fighting.

Techniques like this require a lot of hip, rotator cuff and spinal flexibility – as well as a fair amount of fast-twitch training. Since it’s not the kip-up, what exactly do you have in mind?

If you can be a little more specific on the style you want to get up in, though, I might be able to help a little more. I’d personally suggest just doing a backward roll to your feet.

I usually do the backwards roll myself because it’s easy to act like you’re stumbling and out of balance after doing it making the opponent think you have no idea what you’re doing, in contrast of the kip-up which doesn’t make that easy.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Zachary_Greene:

I’ve lost 30pounds in the last year according to my yearly checkup…
And to believe I’ve only started trying in the last month.

Keep it up, man. : ) Hard work and determination are the best supplements on the market.

Originally posted by Lei_Wulong:
Originally posted by TheGoldenHammer:
Originally posted by Lei_Wulong:

Any tips on exercises which would allow me to get up from a lying down position to standing position? I’m asking because that’s kinda my trademark in fighting.

Techniques like this require a lot of hip, rotator cuff and spinal flexibility – as well as a fair amount of fast-twitch training. Since it’s not the kip-up, what exactly do you have in mind?

If you can be a little more specific on the style you want to get up in, though, I might be able to help a little more. I’d personally suggest just doing a backward roll to your feet.

I usually do the backwards roll myself because it’s easy to act like you’re stumbling and out of balance after doing it making the opponent think you have no idea what you’re doing, in contrast of the kip-up which doesn’t make that easy.

Ah, okay. Well, the things I do have would be too dangerous to suggest practicing without a spotter/buddy, not to mention I’d have to show you myself because I can’t find any videos for it. (I never know the names of this kind of stuff, lol)

Hopefully someone else can get to you on this thread!