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does anyone here work as an engineer or know about someone like that?

14 posts

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Well since I am going to be an engineer approx. 5 or 6 years after this post I wanted to know others experiences with the job just out of pure curiosity…

Idk if this fits more in SD thought.

 
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My dad is a engineer.

 
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Engineer is a broad term. What kind of engineer?

 
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I thought you wanted to do English translations?


Hallucent has done a lot of engineering and he’s majoring in engineering right now if you want to speak to him on that. Finkidz also knows a lot too.

Also this:

Originally posted by EndlessSporadic:

Engineer is a broad term. What kind of engineer?

 
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TerribleToaster is a civil engineer I believe. He’s a cool guy that has no time for us anymore.
My ex is going to the best engineering school in the state. She’s smarter than me, for sure.

Which brings me to my warning. Unless you’re comfortable going past Calculus II mathematics, you will be having a terrible time in most engineering programs. It’s very, very, very math intensive.

Engineering is too broad of a term to really give a proper job description. This is a good link to show you just how broad engineering is. You’ll have to be more specific if you’re wanting an accurate job description.

 
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Originally posted by MmeBunneh:

I thought you wanted to do English translations?


Hallucent has done a lot of engineering and he’s majoring in engineering right now if you want to speak to him on that. Finkidz also knows a lot too.

Also this:

Originally posted by EndlessSporadic:

Engineer is a broad term. What kind of engineer?

traductions*

 
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As an engineer, I have many engineering experiences.

 
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aguspal is going to be a “sanitation engineer” lololol :>>>

 
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Just use google. I’m sure you can see people write about their experiences as an engineer.

 
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Engineering as a term refers more to a school of thought on how to approach problem solving, and as such, it can be applied to most any field with good results (there is a reason many fortune 500 company CEO’s have engineering degrees). Of course, it is correct to assume that you should pick a field of specialization (i.e. I have degrees in civil and architectural engineering) that pertains to your interests and this can radically change how you experience your work. For example, my branch of engineering deals with the civil/architectural/environmental industry and consequently we have a large emphasis how exactly how deadly mistakes are here (since millions or billions could die). There is even a saying that civil engineers have killed more people than wars have and is central to a lot of ethical debate.

Another aspect to think about, besides a field of study, is the type of engineer you want to be; are you going to be a research engineer, a field engineer, a design engineer, etc? It is important to think about not just what you want to do, but how you want to do it.

Lastly, as some advice, most people drop out of engineering programs in their first year because it is difficult, and I have found that the people most likely to drop out are those who are most intellectually gifted. As I said before, engineering is a way of thinking rather than a body of knowledge, if you are not prepared to accept that the way you normally thought about things is inadequate, then you’ll probably have a pretty tough time being an engineer. They key to survival is not having a strong mind, but rather having a flexible one.

 
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Originally posted by TerribleToaster:

Engineering as a term refers more to a school of thought on how to approach problem solving, and as such, it can be applied to most any field with good results (there is a reason many fortune 500 company CEO’s have engineering degrees).

It’s interesting you say that, I just landed a really good job for the summer doing something that has nothing to do with engineering/physics even though that’s what I’m studying. The guy employing me told me that he likes hiring engineers for that reason: it’s not the actual content that they know, it’s a way of thinking. It’s the skill of problem solving.

 
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my dad is an engineer that works on machines that cuts things, or so he told me.

  1. Be prepared to put your life at risk alot, especially with powerful machines.
  2. Double check if the environment is safe for you to operate in, even if someone else already said its safe (especially if someone else said its safe). my dad would’ve been electrocuted if he had listen to one of his coworkers when he said the machine he is supposed to work on is powered down and safe.
  3. You might have to deal with life shortening chemicals on a regular basis.
  4. You have to be buff, as an engineer you will need strong arms to take apart and operate on machines and lift solid metal machine parts.
  5. You will have to get dirty alot and get covered with motor oil and coolant and whatnot, these things when they get in your clothes are extremely difficult to get out. I had to wash my dads clothes 4-6 times before he told me its not going to smell any better and not to wash it with anything else because those clothes will also get contaminated with the coolant stank.
 
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One last thing- I’m convinced that anyone can be an engineer. Sure, it may come easier to some people, but when it comes down to it, anyone studying engineering or a hard science is going to sit down and bust their ass over a textbook at some point. Eventually, like everyone else, you’ll hit the point where it’s just not so intuitive anymore and you’ll just have to plow through it.

The reason I’m convinced of this is because of the woman who oversees the research I do in physics- she has a PhD in the field and is genuinely one of the stupidest people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting.

 
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Originally posted by finkidz5_:

One last thing- I’m convinced that anyone can be an engineer. Sure, it may come easier to some people, but when it comes down to it, anyone studying engineering or a hard science is going to sit down and bust their ass over a textbook at some point. Eventually, like everyone else, you’ll hit the point where it’s just not so intuitive anymore and you’ll just have to plow through it.

The reason I’m convinced of this is because of the woman who oversees the research I do in physics- she has a PhD in the field and is genuinely one of the stupidest people I have ever had the pleasure of meeting.

would love to hear the story when you found this out, sounds like it would be very entertaining :)