Forums Off-topic

Formatting Guide

50 posts

Flag Post

The abridged version can be found Here

Besides the basics Like:




Italics




BOLD

Quotes



Hyper Links



  • And



    1. list




      There are many other Undisclosed Formatting techniques that you can use to really help your Guides, and loooong winded post become more readable. Those Will be covered ni 5 Easy Sections! Yey








      The Basics

      (ZOMG HOW DID I MAKE THAT TEXT SO BIG?????)



      over all the basic that were presented above and introduce you to those unknown basics. Like Large te
      Summary: This Section will cover text-formatting, and small text formatting.




      Lesson 1: Text formatting on Kongregate now I’m not going to bore you with the history of formatted text but if you really want to know about it use wikipedia! Lets start out with the basics:




      Italics



      What are italics used for?



    2. Emphasis: “Smith wasn’t the only guilty party, it’s true.”



    3. The titles of works that stand by themselves, such as books or newspapers: “There was a performance of Beethoven’s Ode to Joy.” Works that appear within larger works, such as short stories, poems, or newspaper articles, are not italicized, but merely set off in quotation marks.



    4. The names of ships: “The Queen Mary sailed last night.”


    5. Foreign words, including the Latin binary nomenclature in the taxonomy of living organisms: “A splendid coq au vin was served”; “Homo sapiens”.


    6. Using a word as an example of a word rather than for its semantic content (see use-mention distinction): “The word the is an article.”



    7. Using a letter or number mentioned as itself:

      * John was annoyed: they had forgotten the h in his name once again.

      * When she saw her name beside the 1 on the rankings, she finally had proof that she was the best.



    8. Introducing or defining terms, especially technical terms or those used in an unusual or different way:[1] “Freudian psychology is based on the ego, the super-ego, and the id.”; “An even number is one that is a multiple of 2.”



    9. Sometimes in novels to indicate a character’s thought process: “This can’t be happening, thought Mary.”



    10. Symbols for physical quantities and other mathematical variables: “The speed of light, c, is approximately equal to 3.00×108 m s-1.”

      Be careful when using italics the slanted characters can prove to be quiet the strain n the eyes and hard to follow.

      How do I use italics on kongregate?

      This is simple all you have to do is add underscores around the text you want in italics like so

      <em>HEY THIS IS IN ITALICS!!!</em>


      The result will be: HEY THIS IS IN ITALICS!!!

      Bold

      I like using bold text, but why? And how should I use it properly?

      The human eye is very receptive to differences in brightness within a text body. One can therefore differentiate between types of emphasis according to whether the emphasis changes the *“blackness”* of text.

      A means of emphasis that does not have much effect on “blackness” is printing in italics, where the text is written in a script style, or oblique, where the vertical orientation of all letters is slanted to the left or right. With one or other of these techniques (usually only one is available for any typeface), words can be highlighted without making them “stick out” much from the rest of the text (inconspicuous stressing). Traditionally, this is used for marking passages that have a different context, such as words from foreign languages, book titles, etc.

      By contrast, boldface makes text darker than the surrounding text. With this technique, the emphasized text strongly stands out from the rest; it should therefore be used to highlight certain keywords that are important to the subject of the text, for easy visual scanning of text. For example, printed dictionaries often use boldface for their keywords, and the names of articles can conventionally be marked in bold.

      How do i use Bold-face font on kongregate?

      This is also extremely simple all you have to do is add assterisk around the text you want in italics like so

      <strong>HEY THIS TEXT IS BOLD!!!</strong>


      The result will be:HEY THIS TEXT IS BOLD!!!

      ULTRA-MEGA-SUPER-D-DUPER-OVERLOADED-GINORMOUS-WARNING! DO NOT USE TO MUCH BOLD-FACE. IT CAN BE VERY IRRITATING TO READ BOLD WHEN EVERYTHING IS BOLD TRY READING THIS TWICE AND YOU’LL SEE WHAT I MEAN!

      Quotes—-THIS ONE IS A MUST READ ON HOW TO USE INCLUDING MODS!!!

      Not only should you be familiar with quoting other peoples post by use of the quote command you should know how to use actual quotation marks with in a post quotes can change the meaning of things dramatically and it is important that you pay attention to these devilish marks. I can’t stress how important it is to use quotation marks it can save you from legal trouble by limiting your liability as to actually claiming its your work, although if you don’t cite the quote properly as well you can still be prosecuted.

    11. Quotations and speech

Not as important to know in forums, but it is still useful…




Single or double quotation marks denote either speech or a quotation. Neither style is an absolute rule, though double quotation marks are preferred in the United States, and single quotation marks in the United Kingdom. A publisher’s or even an author’s style may take precedence over national general preferences. The important rule is that the style of opening and closing quotes must be matched.

‘Good morning, Dave,’ greeted HAL.


“Good morning, Dave,” greeted HAL.


For speech within speech, the other is used as inner quotation marks.




bq. ‘HAL said, “Good morning, Dave,” ’ recalled Frank.


“HAL said, ‘Good morning, Dave,’ ” recalled Frank.


Omitting quotes is generally not recommended.<—-see that I used bold properly

In most cases, quotations that span multiple paragraphs should be block-quoted , and thus do not require quotation marks. Quotation marks are used for multiple-paragraph quotations in some cases, especially in narratives.The convention in English is to give the first and each subsequent paragraph opening quotes, using closing quotes only for the final paragraph of the quotation.

When quoted text is interrupted, such as with the phrase he said, a closing quotation mark is used before the interruption, and an opening quotation mark after. Commas are also often used before and after the interruption, more often for quotations of speech than for quotations of text.

“HAL,” noted Frank, “said that everything was going extremely well.”


It is generally considered incorrect to use quotation marks for paraphrased speech.

EXAMPLE:




If HAL says: *“All systems are functional.”*

Wrong: HAL said that “Everything was going extremely well.”


Right: HAL said that everything was going extremely well.


Right: HAL said, “All systems are functional.”


However, another convention when quoting text in the body of a paragraph or sentence, especially in philosophical essays, is to recognize double quotation marks as marking an exact quote, and single quotation marks as marking a paraphrased quote or a quote where pronouns or plurality have been changed in order to fit the sentence containing the quote.

  • Irony VERY IMPORTANT




    Another important use of quotation marks is to indicate or call attention to ironic or apologetic words. Ironic quotes can also be called scare, sneer, shock, or distance quotes. Ironic quotes are sometimes gestured in oral speech using air quotes: My brother claimed he was too “busy” to help me.

    Ironic quotes should be used with care. Without the intonational cues of speech, they could obscure the writer’s intended meaning. They could also be confused easily with quotations.

    In a similar sense, quotes are also used to indicate that the writer realizes that the word is not being used in its (currently) accepted sense.

    In the fifteenth century, we “knew” that the Sun’s revolution divided day from night. Woody Allen joked, “I’m astounded by people who want to ‘know’ the universe when it’s hard enough to find your way around Chinatown.”

  • Emphasis (incorrect)




    Quotes are sometimes used incorrectly for emphasis in lieu of underlining or italics, most commonly on signs or placards. This usage can be confused with ironic or altered-usage quotation, sometimes with unintended humor. For example – For sale: “fresh” fish, “fresh” oysters – could be construed to imply that fresh is not used with its everyday meaning, or indeed to indicate that the fish or oysters are anything but fresh. And again – Teller lines open until noon for your “convenience” – might mean that the “convenience” was for the bank employees, not the customers.




    That is why it is important to know when to use Quotes, Italics, and Bold-face font.



  • Use–mention distinction




    Either quotes or italic type can emphasize that an instance of a word refers to the word itself rather than its associated concept.




    EXAMPLE:

  • Cheese is derived from milk.(Is the first sentence in a fictional story)


  • “Cheese” is derived from a word in Old English.(Since cheese is being referred to from previous mentions use ” ”)



    OR



  • Cheese has calcium, protein, and phosphorus.(Is the first sentence in a fictional story)


  • Cheese has three e’s.(Since cheese is being referred to from previous mentions use italics)





A three-way distinction is occasionally made between normal use of a word (no quotes), referencing the concept behind the word (single quotes), and the word itself (double quotes):

When discussing ‘use’, use “use”.

This is read: When discussing ‘Some word’, use “That word in double qoutes”

  • Titles of artistic works




    Quotation marks, rather than italics, are generally used for the titles of shorter works. Whether these are single or double is again a matter of style:
  • Short fiction, poetry, etc.: Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Sentinel”



  • Book chapters: The first chapter of 3001: The Final Odyssey is “Comet Cowboy”



  • Articles in books, magazines, journals, etc.: “Extra-Terrestrial Relays,” Wireless World, October 1945



  • Album tracks, singles, etc.: David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”



  • Nicknames and false titles

    Quotation marks offset a nickname embedded in an actual name, or a false or ironic title embedded in an actual title; for example, Nat “King” Cole.

    Ok thats all fun and games, but HOW DO I QUOTE STUFF IN GREEEEENNNNNNAAAA!!!! ><

    Simple just place “bq.” plus a space after the period in “bq. ” and add your text!

    bq. HEY THIS TEXT IS QUOTED 1337N322!!!


    The result will be:

    HEY THIS TEXT IS QUOTED 1337N322!!!


    Hyper Links

    Hyper links not only allow you to turn any text into a link to where ever on teh interwebs (where ever is between here and there fyi…) it also allows you to imbed links int text as demonstrated above in the comment on block-quotes, and it will shorten long URL’s, and it can allow for surprises since many URL’s will give away the secret.

    Example:

    Hey you guys you have to see this: www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/kittycat.php

    Will become this

    Hey guys you have to see this: Click Here




    Now if they don’t pay attention to the bottom of there screen where all information running to and fro the browser is being displayed it can add more of a surprise to the video since they wouldn’t know it was about a kitty cat!

    How do I hyper link and why do yo uinsist on making me read your guide before I see just how to do it?!

    Ok…ok as usual Hyper linking is simple….

    Simply put the text you want turned into link in quote marks like so “This will be a link” add a colon ” : ” then the URL of the site you want linked, ” http://Slavehack.com ” like so…

    <a href="http://www.Slavehack.com&lt;/pre"&gt;This will be a link</a>>
    
    	

    <br>

    NOSPACES NOSPACES NOSPACES

    <br> The result will be:

    <a href="http://www.slavehack.com"&gt;This will be a link</a> <br> <br> See? fácil!

    <h3>List: Numerical and Alphabetical</h3> List are great for displaying large quantities of information with many separate subjects, nouns, and stand alone sentences. Especially helpful for rules, "listed" information, and one word comma separated sentences!

    Instead of saying:

    *"When you are a football player you must have shoulder pads, knees pads, helmet, football cleet's, and Muscles."* <br> <br> You can say... <br> <br> <br>

    <strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>

    1. Shoulder Pads
    2. Knee Pads
    3. Helmet
    4. Football Cleet's
    5. and Muscle's...

<br> <br> <br> Or <br> <br> <br>

<strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>

  • Shoulder Pads
  • Knee Pads
  • Helmet
  • Football Cleet's
  • and Muscle's...

<br> <br> <br> Although that not entirely accurate you get the point :P

<strong>B-B-BBBB-But PH-Ph-phatttt_cccc-cccat how do i do that its so COOL!</strong>

Calm down billy CALM DOWN.

Heres how

To get a numbered list you must add a " # " before the text you want listed there can be no space between the " # " and the far left side of the screen in order for the forum t render the code properly. like so...

<strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>

	
  1. Shoulder Pads
  2. Knee Pads
  3. Helmet
  4. Football Cleet's
  5. and Muscle's...

and to get a un-numbered list use and asterisk instead of the number sign. The same rules apply….

<strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>

	
  • Shoulder Pads
  • Knee Pads
  • Helmet
  • Football Cleet's
  • and Muscle's...

remember there needs to be a space between the ” * ”, ” # ” and the text to have it rendered correctly, but not between the far left side of the page and the ” * ”, ” # ”.

Well that’s it for chapter one in chapter two i will cover the really neat stuff, like those section breaks I made, smilies, and netiquette. I will make a one-time-glance list for you to view quickly as well, but for now read this entire thing :P

-Phatcat







Legal Mumbojumbo:

Information herein this post came from both sources outside, and inside of mine own. Those include Wikipedia:The free Encyclopedia.Credit shall be noted too Albinoblacksheep.com, and Slavehack.com for the use of links to their sites with parts of this post. All information is respectfully credited to both Wikipedia, and Myself. Any attempts to Modify, Copy with out Credit or attempts to republish this in its majority or its entirety* are forbidden. But the information within can be used with no potential litigation. Although saying where you received the information from would be nice.

*Reserve the right to define.

-Compiled by PhatcatThe abridged version can be found Here

Besides the basics Like:




Italics




BOLD

Quotes



Hyper Links



  • And



  • list




    There are many other Undisclosed Formatting techniques that you can use to really help your Guides, and loooong winded post become more readable. Those Will be covered ni 5 Easy Sections! Yey








    The Basics

    (ZOMG HOW DID I MAKE THAT TEXT SO BIG?????)



    over all the basic that were presented above and introduce you to those unknown basics. Like Large te
    Summary: This Section will cover text-formatting, and small text formatting.




    Lesson 1: Text formatting on Kongregate now I’m not going to bore you with the history of formatted text but if you really want to know about it use wikipedia! Lets start out with the basics:




    Italics



    What are italics used for?



  • Emphasis: “Smith wasn’t the only guilty party, it’s true.”



  • The titles of works that stand by themselves, such as books or newspapers: “There was a performance of Beethoven’s Ode to Joy.” Works that appear within larger works, such as short stories, poems, or newspaper articles, are not italicized, but merely set off in quotation marks.



  • The names of ships: “The Queen Mary sailed last night.”


  • Foreign words, including the Latin binary nomenclature in the taxonomy of living organisms: “A splendid coq au vin was served”; “Homo sapiens”.


  • Using a word as an example of a word rather than for its semantic content (see use-mention distinction): “The word the is an article.”



  • Using a letter or number mentioned as itself:

    * John was annoyed: they had forgotten the h in his name once again.

    * When she saw her name beside the 1 on the rankings, she finally had proof that she was the best.



  • Introducing or defining terms, especially technical terms or those used in an unusual or different way:[1] “Freudian psychology is based on the ego, the super-ego, and the id.”; “An even number is one that is a multiple of 2.”



  • Sometimes in novels to indicate a character’s thought process: “This can’t be happening, thought Mary.”



  • Symbols for physical quantities and other mathematical variables: “The speed of light, c, is approximately equal to 3.00×108 m s-1.”

    Be careful when using italics the slanted characters can prove to be quiet the strain n the eyes and hard to follow.

    How do I use italics on kongregate?

    This is simple all you have to do is add underscores around the text you want in italics like so

    <em>HEY THIS IS IN ITALICS!!!</em>


    The result will be: HEY THIS IS IN ITALICS!!!

    Bold

    I like using bold text, but why? And how should I use it properly?

    The human eye is very receptive to differences in brightness within a text body. One can therefore differentiate between types of emphasis according to whether the emphasis changes the *“blackness”* of text.

    A means of emphasis that does not have much effect on “blackness” is printing in italics, where the text is written in a script style, or oblique, where the vertical orientation of all letters is slanted to the left or right. With one or other of these techniques (usually only one is available for any typeface), words can be highlighted without making them “stick out” much from the rest of the text (inconspicuous stressing). Traditionally, this is used for marking passages that have a different context, such as words from foreign languages, book titles, etc.

    By contrast, boldface makes text darker than the surrounding text. With this technique, the emphasized text strongly stands out from the rest; it should therefore be used to highlight certain keywords that are important to the subject of the text, for easy visual scanning of text. For example, printed dictionaries often use boldface for their keywords, and the names of articles can conventionally be marked in bold.

    How do i use Bold-face font on kongregate?

    This is also extremely simple all you have to do is add assterisk around the text you want in italics like so

    <strong>HEY THIS TEXT IS BOLD!!!</strong>


    The result will be:HEY THIS TEXT IS BOLD!!!

    ULTRA-MEGA-SUPER-D-DUPER-OVERLOADED-GINORMOUS-WARNING! DO NOT USE TO MUCH BOLD-FACE. IT CAN BE VERY IRRITATING TO READ BOLD WHEN EVERYTHING IS BOLD TRY READING THIS TWICE AND YOU’LL SEE WHAT I MEAN!

    Quotes—-THIS ONE IS A MUST READ ON HOW TO USE INCLUDING MODS!!!

    Not only should you be familiar with quoting other peoples post by use of the quote command you should know how to use actual quotation marks with in a post quotes can change the meaning of things dramatically and it is important that you pay attention to these devilish marks. I can’t stress how important it is to use quotation marks it can save you from legal trouble by limiting your liability as to actually claiming its your work, although if you don’t cite the quote properly as well you can still be prosecuted.

  • Quotations and speech
  • Not as important to know in forums, but it is still useful…




    Single or double quotation marks denote either speech or a quotation. Neither style is an absolute rule, though double quotation marks are preferred in the United States, and single quotation marks in the United Kingdom. A publisher’s or even an author’s style may take precedence over national general preferences. The important rule is that the style of opening and closing quotes must be matched.

    ‘Good morning, Dave,’ greeted HAL.


    “Good morning, Dave,” greeted HAL.


    For speech within speech, the other is used as inner quotation marks.




    bq. ‘HAL said, “Good morning, Dave,” ’ recalled Frank.


    “HAL said, ‘Good morning, Dave,’ ” recalled Frank.


    Omitting quotes is generally not recommended.<—-see that I used bold properly

    In most cases, quotations that span multiple paragraphs should be block-quoted , and thus do not require quotation marks. Quotation marks are used for multiple-paragraph quotations in some cases, especially in narratives.The convention in English is to give the first and each subsequent paragraph opening quotes, using closing quotes only for the final paragraph of the quotation.

    When quoted text is interrupted, such as with the phrase he said, a closing quotation mark is used before the interruption, and an opening quotation mark after. Commas are also often used before and after the interruption, more often for quotations of speech than for quotations of text.

    “HAL,” noted Frank, “said that everything was going extremely well.”


    It is generally considered incorrect to use quotation marks for paraphrased speech.

    EXAMPLE:




    If HAL says: *“All systems are functional.”*

    Wrong: HAL said that “Everything was going extremely well.”


    Right: HAL said that everything was going extremely well.


    Right: HAL said, “All systems are functional.”


    However, another convention when quoting text in the body of a paragraph or sentence, especially in philosophical essays, is to recognize double quotation marks as marking an exact quote, and single quotation marks as marking a paraphrased quote or a quote where pronouns or plurality have been changed in order to fit the sentence containing the quote.

    • Irony VERY IMPORTANT




      Another important use of quotation marks is to indicate or call attention to ironic or apologetic words. Ironic quotes can also be called scare, sneer, shock, or distance quotes. Ironic quotes are sometimes gestured in oral speech using air quotes: My brother claimed he was too “busy” to help me.

      Ironic quotes should be used with care. Without the intonational cues of speech, they could obscure the writer’s intended meaning. They could also be confused easily with quotations.

      In a similar sense, quotes are also used to indicate that the writer realizes that the word is not being used in its (currently) accepted sense.

      In the fifteenth century, we “knew” that the Sun’s revolution divided day from night. Woody Allen joked, “I’m astounded by people who want to ‘know’ the universe when it’s hard enough to find your way around Chinatown.”

    • Emphasis (incorrect)




      Quotes are sometimes used incorrectly for emphasis in lieu of underlining or italics, most commonly on signs or placards. This usage can be confused with ironic or altered-usage quotation, sometimes with unintended humor. For example – For sale: “fresh” fish, “fresh” oysters – could be construed to imply that fresh is not used with its everyday meaning, or indeed to indicate that the fish or oysters are anything but fresh. And again – Teller lines open until noon for your “convenience” – might mean that the “convenience” was for the bank employees, not the customers.




      That is why it is important to know when to use Quotes, Italics, and Bold-face font.



    • Use–mention distinction




      Either quotes or italic type can emphasize that an instance of a word refers to the word itself rather than its associated concept.




      EXAMPLE:

    • Cheese is derived from milk.(Is the first sentence in a fictional story)


    • “Cheese” is derived from a word in Old English.(Since cheese is being referred to from previous mentions use ” ”)



      OR



    • Cheese has calcium, protein, and phosphorus.(Is the first sentence in a fictional story)


    • Cheese has three e’s.(Since cheese is being referred to from previous mentions use italics)





    A three-way distinction is occasionally made between normal use of a word (no quotes), referencing the concept behind the word (single quotes), and the word itself (double quotes):

    When discussing ‘use’, use “use”.

    This is read: When discussing ‘Some word’, use “That word in double qoutes”

    • Titles of artistic works




      Quotation marks, rather than italics, are generally used for the titles of shorter works. Whether these are single or double is again a matter of style:
    • Short fiction, poetry, etc.: Arthur C. Clarke’s “The Sentinel”



    • Book chapters: The first chapter of 3001: The Final Odyssey is “Comet Cowboy”



    • Articles in books, magazines, journals, etc.: “Extra-Terrestrial Relays,” Wireless World, October 1945



    • Album tracks, singles, etc.: David Bowie’s “Space Oddity”



    • Nicknames and false titles

      Quotation marks offset a nickname embedded in an actual name, or a false or ironic title embedded in an actual title; for example, Nat “King” Cole.

      Ok thats all fun and games, but HOW DO I QUOTE STUFF IN GREEEEENNNNNNAAAA!!!! ><

      Simple just place “bq.” plus a space after the period in “bq. ” and add your text!

      bq. HEY THIS TEXT IS QUOTED 1337N322!!!


      The result will be:

      HEY THIS TEXT IS QUOTED 1337N322!!!


      Hyper Links

      Hyper links not only allow you to turn any text into a link to where ever on teh interwebs (where ever is between here and there fyi…) it also allows you to imbed links int text as demonstrated above in the comment on block-quotes, and it will shorten long URL’s, and it can allow for surprises since many URL’s will give away the secret.

      Example:

      Hey you guys you have to see this: www.albinoblacksheep.com/flash/kittycat.php

      Will become this

      Hey guys you have to see this: Click Here




      Now if they don’t pay attention to the bottom of there screen where all information running to and fro the browser is being displayed it can add more of a surprise to the video since they wouldn’t know it was about a kitty cat!

      How do I hyper link and why do yo uinsist on making me read your guide before I see just how to do it?!

      Ok…ok as usual Hyper linking is simple….

      Simply put the text you want turned into link in quote marks like so “This will be a link” add a colon ” : ” then the URL of the site you want linked, ” http://Slavehack.com ” like so…

      <a href="http://www.Slavehack.com&lt;/pre"&gt;This will be a link</a>>
      
      	

      <br>

      NOSPACES NOSPACES NOSPACES

      <br> The result will be:

      <a href="http://www.slavehack.com"&gt;This will be a link</a> <br> <br> See? fácil!

      <h3>List: Numerical and Alphabetical</h3> List are great for displaying large quantities of information with many separate subjects, nouns, and stand alone sentences. Especially helpful for rules, "listed" information, and one word comma separated sentences!

      Instead of saying:

      *"When you are a football player you must have shoulder pads, knees pads, helmet, football cleet's, and Muscles."* <br> <br> You can say... <br> <br> <br>

      <strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>

      1. Shoulder Pads
      2. Knee Pads
      3. Helmet
      4. Football Cleet's
      5. and Muscle's...

    <br> <br> <br> Or <br> <br> <br>

    <strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>

    • Shoulder Pads
    • Knee Pads
    • Helmet
    • Football Cleet's
    • and Muscle's...

    <br> <br> <br> Although that not entirely accurate you get the point :P

    <strong>B-B-BBBB-But PH-Ph-phatttt_cccc-cccat how do i do that its so COOL!</strong>

    Calm down billy CALM DOWN.

    Heres how

    To get a numbered list you must add a " # " before the text you want listed there can be no space between the " # " and the far left side of the screen in order for the forum t render the code properly. like so...

    <strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>
    
    	
    1. Shoulder Pads
    2. Knee Pads
    3. Helmet
    4. Football Cleet's
    5. and Muscle's...

      and to get a un-numbered list use and asterisk instead of the number sign. The same rules apply….

      <strong>When you are football player you must have 5 things:</strong>
      
      	
      • Shoulder Pads
      • Knee Pads
      • Helmet
      • Football Cleet's
      • and Muscle's...

        remember there needs to be a space between the ” * ”, ” # ” and the text to have it rendered correctly, but not between the far left side of the page and the ” * ”, ” # ”.

        Well that’s it for chapter one in chapter two i will cover the really neat stuff, like those section breaks I made, smilies, and netiquette. I will make a one-time-glance list for you to view quickly as well, but for now read this entire thing :P

        -Phatcat







        Legal Mumbojumbo:

        Information herein this post came from both sources outside, and inside of mine own. Those include Wikipedia:The free Encyclopedia.Credit shall be noted too Albinoblacksheep.com, and Slavehack.com for the use of links to their sites with parts of this post. All information is respectfully credited to both Wikipedia, and Myself. Any attempts to Modify, Copy with out Credit or attempts to republish this in its majority or its entirety* are forbidden. But the information within can be used with no potential litigation. Although saying where you received the information from would be nice.

        *Reserve the right to define.

        -Compiled by Phatcat

     
    Flag Post

    Sweet thanks for the guide!

     
    Flag Post

    Since this is a formatting guide, can’t hurt to say…

    format c:
     
    Flag Post

    Will do just wait until chapter two though :O then you’ll be an Uber 1337 text formatting master like meh !

     
    Flag Post

    I am have deleted my old post so you can have the first two in quick succession.

    Edit:Good luck finding all these people and getting them to delete their posts…

     
    Flag Post

    You have a lot of free time.

     
    Flag Post

    thankyou for such wonderful feed back.

     
    Flag Post

    Sticky sticky sticky! This guide really needs to be brown and wooden!

     
    Flag Post

    I know I looked for this guide but I couldn’t remember where it was ;_; but I want to put the pictures in there not the links!! And your guide doesn’t tell me how to put a picture so that it will show directly in the forum!

     
    Flag Post

    Method 1:

    !http://img510.imageshack.us/img510/6100/wiimotegt5.png!


    Method 2:

    <img src="http://img510.imageshack.us/img510/6100/wiimotegt5.png"&gt;&lt;/img&gt;
     
    Flag Post

    Kongregate!

    Hi

    Yo

     
    Flag Post

    Sorry its taking me so long to get part two done

    i’ve almost finished though so it will be up by mid week (wed-Thurs.)

     
    Flag Post

    I know this seems like a massive bump but…..does anyone want me to complete part two or can I delete this excessively long post?

     
    Flag Post

    what book started with, Bq. cheese is derived from milk. ?

     
    Flag Post

    I know this seems like a massive bump but…..does anyone want me t complete part two or can i delete this excessively long post?

    I think it would help… But if you do make it, I’d leave out the Wikipedia stuff. Bleh.

     
    Flag Post

    I know this seems like a massive bump but…..does anyone want me t complete part two or can i delete this excessively long post?

    I say, go for it.

     
    Flag Post
    1. 1. You should note that neither ordered nor unordered lists work properly at the moment; they both end up looking exactly the same when people check your post. Also, the different kinds aren’t numerical and alphabetical, they’re ordered and unordered. I have to admit I don’t know where you got “alphabetical” from, it’s just dots.
    2. 2. You should probably mention that Kong accepts most html. <b>blah</b> is equivalent to *blah*
    3. 3. If you’re making a style guide, it’s probably a good idea to properly use apostrophes. The “here comes an s!” school of grammar is not widely accepted.
     
    Flag Post

    mention what you said here in the 2nd part of this guide

    and the list does work… it’s just iffy.

     
    Flag Post

    Nice work Phatcat, I think this should be made a sticky and possibly include how the same can be done with HTML tags. Also include links to sites on textiles and HTML tags (sorry, running out the door in 5 min, will possibly post such links later).

    I do have a question though, I attempted to use superscripts and subscripts with the ^ and ~ respectivly and could not get it to work properly and went with the HTML tags instead. Could you give an example as when I tried it would include the closing ~ or somehow leave out much of my post.

    Definitly create part two to include items you did not cover and also add how to insert unicode characters (™), as many do not know about this as well. Just some ideas.

     
    Flag Post

    read the date this thread was made.

     
    Flag Post

    It would probably be a good idea to spell ‘formatting’ right (title).

     
    Flag Post

    how do i make giant letter’s without that complicated HTML code that i found in textile?

     
    Flag Post

    How do I make things in grey quotes instead of green?

     
    Flag Post

    How do I make things in grey quotes instead of green?

    Use <pre>Text

    Also Phatcat, I just realized you spelled formatting wrong >_>

     
    Flag Post

    Thanks, how do I make it so that my text isn’t right next to the border (like it is below)

    ??