Why are games dying

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When I mean games I mean games like Crysis 3 multiplayer or medal of honor warfighter. They died so fast. Crysis 3 is still alive though. Far cry 3 died instantly. I wonder what can be killing such great games .-.

 
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The reason so many multiplayer FPS games are dying online is because of games like COD, Battlefield, or Halo. Those series have pretty much dominated the online multiplayer arena (at least for first-person shooters), so it’s hard for developers to come out with something good enough to compete with them because of their immense popularity.

 
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how exactly did far cry die…? Blood dragon did quite well.

 
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Because FPS is a VERY similar genre. ‘Games’ aren’t ‘dying’, most FPSes Die due to everyone Playing either CoD or BF3

 
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The games aren’t really dying, they more like evolving. This generation has had so many changes in gaming.

 
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cuz they arent in depth multiplayers
they are mostly shoot and get score
in other games there are more stuff like getting new guns etc

 
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The market is over satured with FPS multiplayer shooters, so it is hard for new ones to be successful.

 
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this is kinda true.

gaming almost reach perfect graphic, it reach the 3d (3ds), ect.

 
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Originally posted by Gabidou99:

this is kinda true.

gaming almost reach perfect graphic, it reach the 3d (3ds), ect.

What is kinda true? Your second statement has very little to do with the topic. Graphics don’t make a game. Visuals are merely one aspect, and games like Minecraft prove that butt fugly graphics won’t keep a game from staying popular for years.

You think the gaming industry has almost reached “perfect graphic[s]?” Define perfect. Just because there are 3D graphics doesn’t say anything about the quality of those visuals. How many 3D scenes are rendered 100% in real time? Most are either pre-rendered cutscenes or real time lowered-frame rate renderings involving pre-rendered objects. Take a look at the movies. Those gorgeous 3D animations are created via many, many computers crunching numbers for days, weeks, and months. Even those aren’t “perfect,” because they are digital. There will always be extra data points between digits, and there is always a cutoff where it is not worth the resources to pursue a higher standard. The goal isn’t “perfect.” It’s usually “good enough to trick the majority of people, and maybe a little bit more.”

Have you heard of the “uncanny valley?” I’m sure you have. It’s a recurring issue with visuals, and is a stark reminder that “perfect” is like that carrot being dangled in front of an ass* to keep it motivated. As simulations of people get nearer and nearer to “perfect,” their credibility drops faster than Miley Cyrus making an attention grab. They look wrong. They feel wrong. Often, they make you feel uncomfortable or disgusted in a way that a less “realistic” image would not. A perfect simulation would be so “real” that you would not notice.

“Perfect” graphics will likely never exist in our lifetime. Photorealism? Sure. That can be done by hand by some skilled artists. That’s not on the same level as constantly shifting animations.

Games can be amazing with hideous graphics. Games can be so boring that they feel more like work than play, even with the greatest contemporary graphics available. Graphics in most cases are just a stylistic camouflage to assist the player’s gaming immersion – they don’t have to be real, just appropriate to the feel.

Have you ever heard of the video game crash in the early 80s? Probably not, since most of you weren’t even born yet and don’t care about the pre-NES/Sega days. The gaming industry has had its ups and downs for decades. Developers will key in on what’s popular and flood the market with attempts to cash in on similarities. Sales rise, then plummet. The difference now is that there is more competition from independents, so there is even more trash available than usual. More good stuff, too. It’s just that you have to search through the dross to find the gloss and yes, that sounded lame even as it came off my fingertips. People have expectations. They assume that another winner is always in the pipeline to be played as soon as they’re done with their current favorite(s), but that can’t always be true. There will be deadish periods. There will be disappointments.

What’s to be done about it? Wait around for something fun. Go do something else. Contact your favorite developers with suggestions. Study game development and join the industry. Any of these. None of these. One way or another, life will go one. So will the gaming industry.

* If you’re a Palahniuk fan, feel free to think of a different analogy