as3, C++ isn't enough

19 posts

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I’ve been watching a lot of BigThink on youtube especially Bjarne Stroustrup.

When it comes to OOP, so far I love as3, and C++ makes a great OOP language, as well as filling a few other gaps. It also taught me how to clean up the way that I coded pretty much over night. (Can’t believe how long I was noobishly faltering and using god objects)

What are the programming languages you guys believe are a must have?
I’ve heard people throw around Haskell and clojure, Java, C++ of course, python, javascript, and probably a few others. I like multipurpose or widely used languages.

 
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I think Haxe is becoming one of those languages. There are more and more resources on Haxe by the day. One year ago I couldn’t find any useful tutorials but now a days they are plenty.

 
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C#

 
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C. Plain. Otherwise a programmer will never (or very slowly) learn about memory management at high level point. Yes it has nothing in OOP department, but I think if a person is lacking in memory management (say allocation a lot of instances where just one or two are needed), give him this to handle, until it’ll work without core dumps :D

 
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I just looked up Haxe and I’m very surprised. I thought it was a modified version of As3 for a long time. Good to get this stuff cleared up.
And it can port to multiple platforms. Thats impressive.
Maybe I will get into Haxe after all.
C sounds good too, but I’ve heard a lot of bad about C# and not too much good.

What about a good web based language?

 
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Web based programming?

Haxe. lol

 
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It depends on your goal. For some, COBOL is a must, while everyone outside of that area would never bother making a hello world in it.

There’s no such thing as “must have” in programming. Languages are tools. You don’t need to know how to use a tool that you’ll never need.

 
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C. Plain. Otherwise a programmer will never (or very slowly) learn about memory management at high level point. Yes it has nothing in OOP department, but I think if a person is lacking in memory management (say allocation a lot of instances where just one or two are needed), give him this to handle, until it’ll work without core dumps :D

C++ itself has quite a few memory management features.
Hm, something you might want to check out is Lua. I don’t know anything about it, sadly, but I have heard that it is object oriented.

As for the bad about C#, it’s not that bad, but it’s not very good either.

 
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well, assuming that I’m learning multiple languages for the purpose of fun…
Heres a short list of some that I’m looking into, if you know the language and have an opinion on it, please let me know!
- Python
- Perl
- Haskell
- Clojure
- JavaScript
- Ajax
- HTML

I understand that Haxe can port to anything. That its really popular here, but its syntax is really similar to as3.
Part of the reason I’m exploring is to see new styles of syntax, and other ways other programming languages do things.
Some are mostly used for the web, for apps, some are primarily useful for scientists and mathematicians, its all quite exciting.

Also Sen, do you know COBOL?
E: omg! COBOL looks fun, it reminds me of Fallout in a way, a 1950 view of a futuristic programming language.

 
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Originally posted by alecz127:
Also Sen, do you know COBOL?

Nope.

 
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I’d recommend Java or C# (one or the other), Javascript, and PHP.

With these, you’d cover a large base and be able to expand each one through the use of another.

For example, my most recent game uses a PHP/Mysql API backend that I wrote to store data. I’ve also used PHP and Javascript to create dynamic websites. I’ve used Java to teach myself most fundamental OOP concepts and data stuctures. I’ve used C# to create the back end to GDR (it wasn’t that memorable or anything spectacular, but it could open up Unity or a whole new branch of game creation).

tl;dr: Pick something that can expand your abilities rather than just reinforcing them.

 
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Of the ones that I’ve used that aren’t AS3:
Python: quite fast to use but it can be somewhat annoying and weird in places, coming from AS3 and C#. Also, no curly brackets is just plain confusing.
C#: Visual Studio is, IMO, a very nice IDE. And C# has very many resources to help with learning. The language seems a lot like AS3 (take out the words “function” or “var” and define “Number” a bit better) so it isn’t hard to learn. Also, XNA and Unity can be taken as further steps (if you’re making games)

 
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C# is becoming one of those languages that is great for creating applications that help you create other applications. I love how it doesn’t use “var” for everything. It makes it easier to keep track of variable types.

I’d say to learn all variations of C, Java, and, as much as I hate to say it, JavaScript.

 
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In response to Endless Sporadic, I’d have to disagree with your last sentence.

Learning C, C++, and Java are definitely worth it. Although C# is becoming quite popular, Java (in my woolly opinion) is much better. Learning Objective-C is also not a good idea. You can’t really do anything with it.
Besides those, it’s probably worth it to look at some python code, as well as HaXe and Lua. However, I still think direct descendants of C are the best.

If you want to do some web design, of course you have to learn javascript.

 
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Languages I’d recommend learning:

  • C/C++
  • Java or C# (Enterprisey, widely used, easy OOP)
  • Python or Ruby (fun/easy scripting language)
  • Javascript
  • Lisp / a Lisp dialect / any FP language
  • MATLAB/Mathematica/Maple/etc. (a math related language)
  • Any assembly language
  • A language that isn’t used all that much (but not an intentionally crazy language. Learning to use something that isn’t mainstream provides a good challenging experience)
  • A language you want to use for a specific purpose

Just because it’s on the list does not mean that I know it :D

 
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Originally posted by SWATLLAMA:

In response to Endless Sporadic, I’d have to disagree with your last sentence.

Learning C, C++, and Java are definitely worth it. Although C# is becoming quite popular, Java (in my woolly opinion) is much better. Learning Objective-C is also not a good idea. You can’t really do anything with it.
Besides those, it’s probably worth it to look at some python code, as well as HaXe and Lua. However, I still think direct descendants of C are the best.

If you want to do some web design, of course you have to learn javascript.

I picked my languages carefully from a professional game design perspective. Unity is becoming very popular and they use JavaScript and C# for scripts. A lot of game engines use C/C++ as their core code. Java is a very popular and useful alternative.

 
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Objective C has less value now, as iDevices has shown to be a fad.

 
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For the last three bullet points on the blobby’s list:
1. I’d recommend learning MOO. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOO_(programming_language) The advantage to that is that it has the coolest name ever.
2. COBOL could be useful, though I’m really not sure what it’s ever used for now.
For assembly languages, learn the one that my TI-84 uses. I want more games. :)

 
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Originally posted by SWATLLAMA:

For the last three bullet points on the blobby’s list:
1. I’d recommend learning MOO. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOO_(programming_language) The advantage to that is that it has the coolest name ever.
2. COBOL could be useful, though I’m really not sure what it’s ever used for now.
For assembly languages, learn the one that my TI-84 uses. I want more games. :)

Yes. More calculator games can only be a good thing. Writing a “quadform” program can only give you so much satisfaction.