Will learning Flash help me learn C++???

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This is a pretty straight-forward question. I want to learn C++, but I think it might be too hard for me to learn right now. I’ve heard flash is a lot easier to learn, which leads into my next question:

If I learn Flash (actionscript3), would it help me learn C++ in the future? Will it make learning C++ any easier? Since C++ opens up so many more options than flash, definitely want to learn it…

And by the way, if you any any other language that would
be a good segue into C++, please mention them!

Thanks in advance!!!

 
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Go for something (more) serious, maybe Java.

 
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is java easier than c++? because what I’m trying to find, is a program that’s not too hard to learn. I’m learning by myself, so I need a good place to start. I also want it to lead into c++, at least help for c++…

 
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I don’t think there’s such a thing as a hard language; there are bad programmers.
Flash may look easier because it’s very visual; you write a couple dozens of lines and you have a moving circle on the screen, but at its core, it’s just as any other language; you give a set of instructions which are interpreted.

Whatever language you pick, start with the basics of it; don’t try to go all hardcore and make an internet browser, P2P application or MMORPG as your first project.

That said, knowing AS3 will help you learn Java and C(anything) since their structure is quite similar.

E: Also, I’d recommend you to use FlashDevelop, as its interface is similar to that of any proper coding IDE. If you use Flash CS you will be all “wtf” when you try to learn another language, as you won’t have pretty tools to draw and a stage to drag stuff into.

 
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Haha, I guess I was being to vague ;). I know I have to start out simple. The first game I’m going to make will probably be the “classic”, pong. or maybe Tetris.

and by “not a hard language”, i mean one that’s easy to pick up on, one that can get me started into programming. Now that I think about, it probably is opinionated, but where I am now in programming, I just want an idea of what other people think.

 
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Honestly, I don’t have any direct experience with C++ other than the examples I’ve come across in AS3 programming books, but when I do come across those examples now, I’m actually able to make sense of them since I understand the context in which they’re written and the general concepts that are operating behind them. From my understanding, AS3 does have a lot of characteristics that are similar to other programming languages, and if you do end up becoming proficient with flash programming, I’m sure it will help.

However, from my own experiences working with flash in the past few month, I’ve found that the greatest learning comes from screwing around with the knowledge you’ve gained and trying to do something new with it. I obviously can’t say much directly about the relative difficulty between flash and C++, but my experience with AS3 has demonstrated, like a lot of things in life, that if you just dive in and try to force it to do what you want it to, you’ll end up learning a great deal in the process, even if you fail in your intermediate goals.

So, that being said, if I were you, if you really want to learn C++, I’m sure there are some great beginner’s books floating around that can guide you from a novice level. If you actually do want to learn AS3 for now, which can do some fun things, there are a few books which I think are really excellent for beginner and intermediate material:

I’m not sure what your current programming knowedge is at this point, but I’ll throw out a few suggestions:

Foundation Game Design with Flash by Rex van der Spuy was an great beginning book. He goes through and thoroughly explains certain problems and guides you through the process of overcoming them. The book remains rather basic throughout, but it’s an excellent introductory book, and once you get through it, you’ll have a very solid handle on a lot of the basics.

Foundation ActionScript 3.0 Animaion: Making Things Move by Keith Peters is another excellent book, and although its a bit more intermediate, if you plan on doing animation or movement in flash, it will definitely not be a waste of money, and the techniques he uses, even when basic, are widely applicable in many different situations. There were so many problems I was able to solve from that book, from simple things like just getting things to rotate consistently with their directional movement, to being able to figure out how to apply conservation of momentum to collisions for more realistic impacts and interactions between objects. His writing style is very clear, and he has plenty of examples in each section to thoroughly demonstrate all of the things he’’s teaching you.

The other big AS3 book I read was Colin Moock’s, and while I think I got a lot out ot if, it’s certainly a great book to have around when you need a thorough explanation of how something works. The problem with Mook’s book, though, is that I feel that there is a prerequisite for either a lot of previous in depth understanding, or a lot of deep confusion. I think you brain needs to be in one of those states to fully process his writing. When you come across something about which you’ve been wracking your brains for weeks, he often has an extremely clear and very enlightening explanation which will answer all questions. Unfortunately, I think you need to have already thought about the things he’s writing about in this 900 page book to get the full value from it.

Sorry, ambien cicked in a couple paragraphs ago, so I might be slightly incoherent.

But, anyway, if you really want to learn flash quickly. I’d say go through a bunch of tutorials, the michael james willams tutorials are great, as well as Moly’s AS3 shooter tutorials, and pickup some of these other books, some of which have parts that are pure gold.

Alright, well, the screen is distorning a bit to much right now, so I’ll bid you farewell and goodluck.

 
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Sorry, I wasn’t being clear. I meant I’m gonna start out with that. My ultimate goal is to do something big, like n64 quality. Maybe a n64 fan game of some kind….

but could java be as widely distributed as c++

And yes… I know the possibility of this idea is many years away (hopefully not too long though haha)

 
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c++ applications are actually much less cross-platform than java ones.

And I don’t actually know why so many people consider tetris to be “simple”, imo it’s pretty complicated and not suited for beginners, because it’s inherently tile-based which means 2D arrays which means confusing for beginners. However I do think that once you’ve mastered arrays and recursion and are moving onto learning OOP then tetris is probably something good to do, especially after you implement the rotate function in a proper OO way and it all works correctly :D

 
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I started with Flash, and then learned some C++. Learning more about a lower level language gave me more insight into how programs worked. I would say that Flash is easier, since the concepts of OOP can easily be applied to a simple video game. I have been learning Java recently, and if you want to make something web facing or that accesses a Database, I think Java has a good set of free tools around it.

 
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Originally posted by jonathanasdf:

And I don’t actually know why so many people consider tetris to be “simple”

Because tutorials made by noobs (aka; most tutorials) don’t tell you to use a bitmap and draw the shapes based on a 2D vector; they tell you to open CS, draw a bunch of shapes and hitTest everything, every frame.

So in the end they make it as basic as a Pong.

 
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Originally posted by Senekis93:
Originally posted by jonathanasdf:

And I don’t actually know why so many people consider tetris to be “simple”

Because tutorials made by noobs (aka; most tutorials) don’t tell you to use a bitmap and draw the shapes based on a 2D vector; they tell you to open CS, draw a bunch of shapes and hitTest everything, every frame.

So in the end they make it as basic as a Pong.

If that’s the case I can’t imagine the end product actually working at all because … well.. it just doesn’t work!

 
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Originally posted by jonathanasdf:
Originally posted by Senekis:
Originally posted by jonathanasdf:

And I don’t actually know why so many people consider tetris to be “simple”

Because tutorials made by noobs (aka; most tutorials) don’t tell you to use a bitmap and draw the shapes based on a 2D vector; they tell you to open CS, draw a bunch of shapes and hitTest everything, every frame.

So in the end they make it as basic as a Pong.

If that’s the case I can’t imagine the end product actually working at all because … well.. it just doesn’t work!

I don’t remember the link, but I’m sure that back in the sad AS2 part of my learning process, there was this tetris tutorial that was similar to what I said (drawing stuff, hit testing everything)… I did a Google search and looked at some of the results but I wasn’t able to find it.

I’d like to know how the hell that thing worked; perhaps it used masks, overlapped objects or some of those fancy tricks that AS2 tutorials are full of.

 
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Originally posted by NineFiveThree:

Go for something (more) serious, maybe Java.

C++ is more serious than Java.


also, moving to unmanaged languages like C++ from highly managed languages like AS3, will cause a new programmer issues. you have to learn about references, pointers, how to allocate and deallocate memory (there are multiple ways to do both)

Originally posted by jonathanasdf:

c++ applications are actually much less cross-platform than java ones.

And I don’t actually know why so many people consider tetris to be “simple”, imo it’s pretty complicated and not suited for beginners, because it’s inherently tile-based which means 2D arrays which means confusing for beginners. However I do think that once you’ve mastered arrays and recursion and are moving onto learning OOP then tetris is probably something good to do, especially after you implement the rotate function in a proper OO way and it all works correctly :D

they’re both more and less cross-platform. C++ allows you to interface with virtually any programmable machine, you just have to program the interface yourself in some applications, and manage OS-dependent things. Java handles that for you, and makes ti easier to write cross-platform code, but you only get supported platforms.

tetris is considered a beginner game by beginners because it looks so damned simple; the 2D graphics confuse people into thinking the programming is insignificant. text and no graphics confuse people into thinking it’s even simpler than 2D graphics, even if it’s a thousand times more complex. i blame 3D games for this.

 
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Originally posted by skyboy:

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:

Go for something (more) serious, maybe Java.

C++ is more serious than Java.

I was comparing Java with Flash.

 
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Would you say it’d be a good move to learn Java, then when I’m pretty proficient in it to move to C++? or maybe go from as3, to java, to C++?

What’s a good “program learning path” to map out?

 
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Programming languages are tools. The tool to use depends on the task. There’s not a path to follow, it depends on your goal and needs.

Of course, when the task requires more than one tool, sometimes it’s better to learn one first. ie, for a simple database, I’d say it’s better to learn PHP before SQL.

 
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That totally depends on you.
As said, if you want to learn some other language before C++, Java is not a bad choice.
This should not become a recursion. Start with Java.

The basics are always the same, if you got them, you can start digging into any other language.
(one of those basics would be to find out what a recursion is, which would make this post fall into place, thus becoming a recursion itself.)

A little less conversation, a little more coding please.

 
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First of all, I found out what recursion meant by google searching. No really, google search “recursion”… there’s a little secret on google haha, see if you can find it ;)

And second of all, thanks to everyone for your help! I think I’m going to learn java primarily, and see where programming takes me :)

but really, look up recursion on google, it’s funny!

 
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Originally posted by Senekis93:

Programming languages are tools. The tool to use depends on the task. There’s not a path to follow, it depends on your goal and needs.

This is probably the best advise for where to start. Start with what you want to do, then pick the right tool.

 
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One last question (I think…)

I’ve heard that python is a good language to learn before learning c++ too. But I, being new to programming and all, no NOTHING about it. What do you guys know about python? Will this language help me to learn c++ eventually? is it more simplistic than C++???

 
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Python is considered “simple” because of the dynamically typed variables (basically means you don’t need to tell the computer “this thing is a number, that thing is a string, etc”), a large number of available built-in functions, and the lack of curly braces {}… for some reason curly braces seem to cause a number of people headaches :\

But if you go deep into it it is as complicated and intricate as any other language.

I personally would NOT suggest you to learn python if your only goal is to find a simpler language to learn as a stepping stone to learning c++. Python is quite different being a dynamically-typed language and python doesn’t really promote OOP well. Java is probably a better choice.

Still:

Originally posted by Eu_Plon_Ka:
Originally posted by Senekis93:

Programming languages are tools. The tool to use depends on the task. There’s not a path to follow, it depends on your goal and needs.

This is probably the best advise for where to start. Start with what you want to do, then pick the right tool.

 
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Yup most programming languages are similar.

 
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Originally posted by DannyDaNinja:

Yup most programming languages are similar.

ok

 
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No, not even a little.

 
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Originally posted by LanceJZ:

No, not even a little.

I learned C# directly from Actionscript; C++ is for the most part a more complicated version of C#. There are formatting hurdles, but aside from that the orientation is the same. There is an onLoad and OnUpdate function (by different names) and the corresponding information goes there. You do not have the graphical flexibility like you do in Flash, but that is something that can be overcome with learning code.