Forums The Arts

Starting off in Art...Help?

17 posts

Flag Post

Hi, I was wondering if anyone could help me start making some decent artwork. Trufuly I have no idea how to start and my goal right now is to make computer art on a casual level. My current expirence is blank except for bad MS paint drawings and a uncanny ability to make art with (get this) Microsoft Office, specificly PowerPoint. Of course there isn’t much potential in my current field so perhaps some kind and dashingly handsome person would care to direct me to some basic art programs for starting out or learning how to operate and be comforatable to use advanced programs (or at least talk about them). Linked tutorials would be good too but my computer is rather old and my mother destroyed its processing power when she used it for work so I would be best off with something I don’t need to sign up or download anything for. Please?

 
Flag Post

If you want to do “computer art on a casual level.” you’ll most likely need to download a program of sorts, GIMP is free and easy-to-use.

http://www.gimp.org/downloads/

 
Flag Post

start making some decent artwork

I want to ask you this question: What is “decent” artwork to you and what do you like in terms of “artwork”?

This is a really important question to answer yourself because “making decent artwork” takes years and years of dedicated experience. It is not an easy task. What makes it fun and exciting is knowing exactly what you like.

For example, I really love to read fantasy novels. I devour them whenever I have the time to, and that has significantly influenced what I like to write (fantasy!). I’m also a big fan of philosophical and social commentaries, and that too has significantly influenced what I write about on a general basis.

What interests you is really important. It isn’t as simple as saying “I really like this” and explaining why. Sometimes, the real complexity lies in not fully understanding why you enjoy some type of art but really enjoying it. I can never tell you, fully, why I love fantasy novels. I could try, but my explanation, in my opinion, will always fall short.

You need to answer this question yourself, but in the meantime, I highly encourage you to try different things. Perhaps a good starting point is here, with the long compilation of links to resources, tools and the like. It seems overwhelming, but if you offer a little bit more of what you would like to do, it gives us more to offer. :)

 
Flag Post

Thanks guys. I got a lot more helpful comments/critism than the off-topic forum.

To answer your question Laxaria, I trufully don’t know. As I said I have no expirence in the field and would like to start exploring all the fields before deciding anything. In fact I don’t even know if I will stay with art though it would be good to find something. I want to come out of high school with a picture of what I want to do, though I doubt I will at best do art at a level more than that of a hobby. So I would perfer something that lets me explore and make art as I learn so I can judge whether I actually like making art or if I’m just going along with the ride hoping in the end it will be fun.

P.S. I actually perfer writing science fiction myself, usually with a suspence/horror theme. I find that if you can relate or see yourself in a situation rather than watch characters in the situation go through the plot. Have the main character make common-sence desicions, be likeable but bland on backstory and avoid obvious this or that scenarios. Just me from my English expirence, like I said just playing the field.

 
Flag Post

Art is something anyone can pick up and learn, we all have our own natural artistic ability, some more talented than others starting off. The hardest part is actually sticking with it and refining your skills, in most people (Like in my case) it can take years to do, just because there’s so many techniques to learn. I would definitely recommend GIMP because it’s free and really similar to Photoshop (Less powerful, but a lot alike and a good start) I suppose it couldn’t hurt starting off with PDN either. It really depends on which direction you want to go with it, if you want to do 3 Dimensional PDN or GIMP wouldn’t be the way to go, and then if you want to do 3D it depends on the types of 3D that you want to do.

 
Flag Post

You have all been really helpful. I probbally start to figure things out myself but you can continue posting anything you feel might help. Knowing my expirence there is probbally someone searching the forums for the answer to how to start in art and they might not even be registered on Kong and unable to ask opinions. Thanks again.

P.S. I never knew people on the internet could actually be decent.

 
Flag Post

Just practice a lot!! Start out with pencil and paper before moving on to computer graphics. And unless you have a tablet, you won’t be able to paint easily on computers.

 
Flag Post

To answer your question Laxaria, I trufully don’t know. As I said I have no expirence in the field and would like to start exploring all the fields before deciding anything.

That’s perfectly fine too. My point is that if you know what you like, starting there would be a good starting point, if only to orientate yourself and familiarise yourself with the tools and things needed. It’s easier to keep doing something when you like what your doing, and liking a particular genre or form of artwork and using what you like about other people’s work as a form of motivation and study point helps in improving your skills.

I read a lot and I like paying attention to how language works, which really only helped me because most of my reading interested me (I wasn’t reading for the sake of reading). Likewise, you shouldn’t be drawing for the sake of drawing. There should be some purpose to it, even if it is something as simple as “I’m bored”.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by GoGoogleIt:

Just practice a lot!! Start out with pencil and paper before moving on to computer graphics. And unless you have a tablet, you won’t be able to paint easily on computers.

Bullshit, I paint with a mouse. Tablets help obviously, but you can paint perfectly fine with a mouse.

 
Flag Post

If you’re interested in digital art, download ChaosPro and Apophysis and read the tutorials. You can create some really cool stuff with those programs

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by CallidoraParker:

If you’re interested in digital art, download ChaosPro and Apophysis and read the tutorials. You can create some really cool stuff with those programs

Horrible advice, yeah ChaosPro and Apophysis are considered digital art. But it’s not really a path most people choose or stick with. Yeah you can make some cool fractals and stuff, but the art you see that is marketed frequently is mainly done in software like Corel painter, Illustrator, Photoshop, Maya 3D, etc. at least that’s what I have seen. While you don’t really see anything in a tv commercial or on a billboard that was clearly done in Apophysis or ChaosPro you will see art that is done in the software I listed above. Now I know art isn’t all about the money and stuff, but if you like it as much as I do you’ll try and find a way to keep your head above water and enjoy it too.

I used to want to make being a digital artist a career, and I’m on the right path, however I am just going to continue with it being a hobby because I have higher priorities to focus on. Most of you younger users are just beginning, and coming from someone who has been doing this a fair amount of time, I’d have to say that you should really try to find a software you enjoy, while having it at the same time make a marketable product. It’s basically having ones cake and eating it too. Granted fractal making programs can make some eye candy pieces, it’s hard to do and a lot of people while saying “Hey that looks cool” might not want to hire you to make a fractal as a background for their ad campaign. For example Nike when they did that series of Lebron James (Or some other basketball player) and it has all the vector lines going around him, I have reason to believe that was done in Maya 3D. It’s too bad I can’t find the ad on YouTube, but if you know what I am talking about, then that would be the kind of thing to go for.

I know you probably won’t agree with me, so I am just going to agree to disagree because nobody really thinks alike. I have my own goals and priorities, while you may just do it for some other reasons, I do what I do for my own reasons.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by GraphicDesignC:
Originally posted by CallidoraParker:

If you’re interested in digital art, download ChaosPro and Apophysis and read the tutorials. You can create some really cool stuff with those programs

Horrible advice, yeah ChaosPro and Apophysis are considered digital art. But it’s not really a path most people choose or stick with. Yeah you can make some cool fractals and stuff, but the art you see that is marketed frequently is mainly done in software like Corel painter, Illustrator, Photoshop, Maya 3D, etc. at least that’s what I have seen. While you don’t really see anything in a tv commercial or on a billboard that was clearly done in Apophysis or ChaosPro you will see art that is done in the software I listed above. Now I know art isn’t all about the money and stuff, but if you like it as much as I do you’ll try and find a way to keep your head above water and enjoy it too.

I used to want to make being a digital artist a career, and I’m on the right path, however I am just going to continue with it being a hobby because I have higher priorities to focus on. Most of you younger users are just beginning, and coming from someone who has been doing this a fair amount of time, I’d have to say that you should really try to find a software you enjoy, while having it at the same time make a marketable product. It’s basically having ones cake and eating it too. Granted fractal making programs can make some eye candy pieces, it’s hard to do and a lot of people while saying “Hey that looks cool” might not want to hire you to make a fractal as a background for their ad campaign. For example Nike when they did that series of Lebron James (Or some other basketball player) and it has all the vector lines going around him, I have reason to believe that was done in Maya 3D. It’s too bad I can’t find the ad on YouTube, but if you know what I am talking about, then that would be the kind of thing to go for.

I know you probably won’t agree with me, so I am just going to agree to disagree because nobody really thinks alike. I have my own goals and priorities, while you may just do it for some other reasons, I do what I do for my own reasons.

I was only suggesting some programs that the person who asked the question might like to try out. It was “horrible advice” as I wasn’t saying “these are the only programs you will ever need”. I wasn’t talking about making digital art as a career because I don’t think that’s what the person who started this would want to do. I just suggested the programs and tutorials because those are good starting points. The person who started the thread may try out those programs and not like them but do research and find other programs they may enjoy using. The programs themselves are not considered digital art, more that what you create with them is. I’ve had a few offers from developers who are interested in using my art in their games. The person who started the thread said they were only interested in making art on a casual level, so I suggested some programs that would be a good start for a new user. In future please read the posts properly before you jump down my throat.

 
Flag Post

I wasn’t jumping down your throat, as you can see I said:

I know you probably won’t agree with me, so I am just going to agree to disagree because nobody really thinks alike. I have my own goals and priorities, while you may just do it for some other reasons, I do what I do for my own reasons.

Which means I’m being passive aggressive, if I meant to actually intentionally be a jerk, and not say what I think of the advice you had to offer then I wouldn’t have agreed to disagree. I’m not set out to argue with you, also you’re being a complete hypocrite; “In future please read the posts properly before you jump down my throat.”, maybe you should read my post properly before you jump down my throat.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by GraphicDesignC:

I wasn’t jumping down your throat, as you can see I said:

I know you probably won’t agree with me, so I am just going to agree to disagree because nobody really thinks alike. I have my own goals and priorities, while you may just do it for some other reasons, I do what I do for my own reasons.

Which means I’m being passive aggressive, if I meant to actually intentionally be a jerk, and not say what I think of the advice you had to offer then I wouldn’t have agreed to disagree. I’m not set out to argue with you, also you’re being a complete hypocrite; “In future please read the posts properly before you jump down my throat.”, maybe you should read my post properly before you jump down my throat. Jerk.

You rambled on for a big paragraph about why a person shouldn’t use two programs I suggested as starting points.

 
Flag Post

You rambled on for a big paragraph about why a person shouldn’t use two programs I suggested as starting points.

Because they aren’t good programs to start off with, at all.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by GraphicDesignC:

You rambled on for a big paragraph about why a person shouldn’t use two programs I suggested as starting points.

Because they aren’t good programs to start off with, at all.

I dont see how fractals can be called art

 
Flag Post

I agree with GoGoogleIt… learning to draw with a good old-fashioned pencil and paper is an excellent way to build your digital skills. Knowing how to use Photoshop will not make you a good artist. Knowing how to draw, (with or without Photoshop), WILL make you a good artist.

A great analogy can be found in rapid prototyping. In game development, a good way to test a design experiment is in Flash. You can mock up a sketch and see how it feels without a lot of time investment. Then you can make an assessment, or conclude something new that you didn’t realize before, without having poured hours into a project.

Drawing skill is acquired by putting in hundreds of hours. If you take those hundreds of hours and put them into software—presuming you are already adept at using that software—you will end up with some number of pieces. If you spent the same amount of time drawing with a pencil, you’d end up with twice as many… but probably many more. You’re going to get better, faster, by traditional methods.