Forums The Arts

Commenting On Art - How To Do It

45 posts

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Increasingly, I’m seeing alot of flame and spam on this forum, caused by people who think they’re showing signs of intelligence by responding to art with comments such as the following:


fail

u suck

u copied it frm google sux

it stupd

ths sux u suk at drawing


I don’t like it, general lurkers don’t like to read it, but most importantly, the author of the art you’re hating doesn’t like to read it.

There is a way to comment on artwork properly without hurting anybody’s feelings, it’s called criticizing, I’m going to start simple with this:


Good: Anything you like about the image goes here (if you like nothing, it’s okay to leave it).

Bad: Anything you don’t like about the image goes here (again, if you think it’s perfect, it’s okay to leave this to).

How to Improve: List any improvements to the image here, whether you’re going to tell somebody if you like their work or not, it’s important that you tell them how to improve, they’re here to get an idea of who likes what about their images, but they can’t improve if nobody tells them how to.


If you’re going to tell somebody you like their work, fine, criticism isn’t entirely necessary (but it’s still nice to let them know how to improve), if you’re going to tell somebody you hate their work, please use this as not only will you be avoiding flame wars, but the author will learn on how to improve on their work from this, and so the Art forum has achieved its purpose.

Thank you for reading.

  • criticizing the spelling of this may differ for different countries D:
 
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i fully agree to this.
:D thumbs up

 
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I agree too.
Tuckerfast is the greatest n00b there ever was, he has set up a “Battle” between me and him!

 
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I agree too.
Tuckerfast is the greatest n00b there ever was, he has set up a “Battle” between me and him!


Your post contradicts itself, the whole point of this topic is to avoid that kind of negative attitude, if you’re unhappy with what they did, tell them, you don’t need to bring it into this thread, or flame him.

Also having said that mooman, I saw the thread, I’m willing to talk with Tucker about this if you’re not happy with what has happened.

 
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Sorry, for flaming or whatever, but he is so annoying!

 
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What do you mean “ahem”?

 
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What do you mean “ahem”?


I have no idea what you’re talking about.


I’d appreciate it if you kept this off-topic stuff away from this topic, I don’t want somebody agreeing with this and then going against it within hours, on the same thread, you’re likely to start a flame war with posts like that, which I really do not want right now ._..


If you’re going to post, I’d rather you only posted your thoughts on criticism, or your thoughts/opinions on what I’ve said, thank you.

 
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No, Its just because someone (can’t remember who it was) posted “ahem” with a link to an age old topic.

 
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This should be a sticky.

 
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Alternatively, the Art Forum Directory could have a link to it ;O.

 
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Actually thats a good idea, because then people can stop posting annoying comments.

 
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ths sux u suk at drawing

 
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This thread

The good: It was made by Jindo, and it has a very informative first post.

The bad: I only love this three fourths as much as I should

Ways to improve: More avatars this time. Get crackin!

 
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I made a thread like this a while ago that indephly described how to rate art. If I find it, I’ll repost.

 
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I know this is a very very old thread, but I felt the need to bump this up to remind people how to critique well and to offer the best help to others’ without being mean, rude or demotivating.

With the onset of many new members into our community, I think we should keep these guidelines in mind.

 
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Thanks, Lax, this is a very good explanation by Jindo. If everyone would keep in mind “Good, Bad, Improve” when writing a critique, it would really help the Art Forum improve as a place for artists to come to learn and grow.

Learning to write a good critique is an important skill for artists who want to grow partly through internet communities. If you regularly give meaningful feedback to good artists, they are likely to return the favor even if you’re not in their league artistically. Often these artists have been where you’ve been and know what you most need to focus on next.

As someone receiving critique, also learn to appreciate negative but substantive critique that someone had to spend time looking at your art to write. Calm down and read it a couple of times. Remember that it’s a gift for someone to spend time and attention with your art (not the time it takes to write “you suck” but something that explains the unique ways they don’t like what you did :P).

 
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Sticky pl0x

 
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“I’m Ozzy123, and I approve this message”
(Screen blacks out to American Flag) :P

 
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Originally posted by ozzy123:

“I’m Ozzy123, and I approve this message”

(Screen blacks out to American Flag) :P

lol nice— also i think this should be a sticky cause i have recently seen some comments on some art that some people have made that is very degrading (Not saying any names— Johanna— JK lol im just kiding) i think it would be very good if a mod copied and pasted the first post and then made a new thread and locked it— it could then be a sticky and maybe it might be a good idea to post it on the first page of collabs so people no how to comment… tell me if my ideas are good or not!! :)

 
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Sweet :D Iv just been rolling around the art forums lately because of my game, but there is alot of neat artwork here, I haven’t experienced it yet but I know this has been a problem, Jo vents sometimes about these rude, rude people, Its nice to see someone taking a proactive solution with this thread :D

 
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Being polite in a critique is only part of it.
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Artists still reserve the right to the question the validity of a critique without necessarily acting defensively/reactionary/offensively.
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In my experience avoid having that happen, a critiquer should:
1. Know what they’re talking about, preferably have experience. Armchair quarterbacking usually won’t help either party.
2. Avoid being overly subjective.
3. Do not make vague/general references. Be direct, definitive, and be clear. Avoid using words like “thing” “something” “maybe” “might”
4. Know that if you suggest a change, you should be expected to delineate the methodology behind it and rationalize the endstate.
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There may be exceptions, i.e. in the case of obvious fixes (but those are exceptional cases). Where more subtle changes and theory are involved, a less-than-solid critique can fail to be convincing.

There’s no need for sugarcoating in a critique at all. But a critique should raise an issue, give a solution, explain how to reach that solution, and justify the action.

It’s not mandatory to do all that, but doing it minimizes the chance that you’ll give the impression that your input is potentially unreliable.

 
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I would like to add to Kvlticon that the tone of your critique can make the receiving artist keep it in mind or completely ignore it.

What I’ve learnt is that different artists want different types of critiques. Some prefer ways on how to improve it instead of looking for flaws in the overall composition. Others prefer ways to improve their technique in a different piece. There are also some that like blunt harsh comments.

One should not make a comment or critique based on what they liked, but based on manners that can help the artist improve.

From my experience, if you spot a problem, suggest a way to improve it. This shows that you are interested in the artists’ work and willing to participate in making it a better piece. It also shows a level of professionalism. Furthermore, the more vague the direction is to improve the errors of a piece, the less likely they are to be helpful.

For example it is better to say “You should remove the text on the bottom left and move it closer to the middle of the focal” than “I think the text is ugly and you should move it.” Sometimes the latter may be useful, but the more specific you can give, along with a good reason for the change will have artists actually reading your critique and acting on it, instead of reading it and simply feeling dejected.

The aim of critique is to help the artist improve, not to demotivate him. Some like harsh critique, but avoid it unless you know that the artist won’t react in even a mildly negative fashion.

And this is also a friendly bump.

 
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Free bump (again) and really think someone should sticky this thread or let someone else remake it with more in-depth information. :)

Example of good and useful advice: Deriaz’s Post

Also, I just noticed how much my communication style has changed from the above post to this.

 
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I agree that there’s some useful information here that could be edited and expanded upon.

I’ve critiqued dozens…perhaps hundreds of portfolios at game conventions. (For 10 years I was senior art director at Wizards of the Coast, a print game company.) When first meeting the artist, and before the book was opened, I would often ask this question:

• What kind of review are you looking for? Are you a professional artist looking for work or are you unpublished and looking for ways to make your work appropriate for Wizards projects?

The answer would help me understand the artist’s expectations. This is really important. When people post their artwork they must be clear about what kind of feedback they’re looking for.

For example, here’s a drawing I did yesterday:

If I would like feedback on whether I should include a faint suggestion of farms and roads behind the plane, I should be specific with that question. If the post gets feedback like, “you suck” or “that’s awesome,” it doesn’t help me with the problem.

For artists simply looking for compliments, the unmoderated internet is probably not the best place to look for them. There will ALWAYS be some untalented kid whose only skill is to piss people off eager to insult someone’s hard work. We cannot avoid or prevent that.

 
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jindo is right