We Pay You to Make Our Game

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Introduction

Hello. We are offering a contract for the development of a flash game. At this time, we have a fully-playable Windows DirectX prototype of the game with 100+ levels. Now, we would like to hire a developer to do all of the flash programming, art, and sound asset creation necessary for the completion of the game.
We will provide the developer with the game rules, all of the levels, and several design documents. Then, the developer will be responsible for doing all of the code, graphics, sound effects, and music for the game. The developer will have to ensure that the finished product is polished and bug-free.

About the Game

The developer will be working on a small, tile-based, turn-based game. There are 6 characters that move around rooms, hallways, and such. There is no combat. The game is about sneaking around and collecting items (think Pac-Man but turn-based).

Payment and Deadline

We will pay $2000 for the completion of this project. The money will be divided up into milestones, paid out when each milestone is reached (i.e. prototype, alpha, beta, gold, and so on). We will expect the developer to complete the entire project in 6 months.

Developer Responsibilities

1. Gameplay and interface code – the developer will write all of the code that makes the game work.

2. Game screen and interface art and design – we will provide the developer with the artistic theme/vision and some sample art work. However, it will be the developer’s responsibility to draw and design how the game will actually look. The characters will require some animation as they move around and perform actions.

3. Sound effects and music. The developer will have to come up with the sound effects and music for the game. We will provide the developer with some sample background music for the game to give the developer an idea of what we are looking for.

4. Incorporate the APIs of sites like Kongregate to enable Leaderboards and Achievements.

5. Abstain from copyright violation. All code, art, sound effects, and music must be the developer’s own or legally acquired by the developer.

6. Testing and Quality Assurance. The developer will be responsible to putting out a finished, bug-free game.

Communication and Approval

Since the work the developer will be doing is independent and long-distance, it will be important for the developer to provide us with regular updates. This will enable us to provide the developer with timely feedback, so that we minimize any wasted labor on the developer’s part and ensure that the developer is going in the right direction. For something like graphics, the developer will want to send us some drafts of how things might look, so that the developer doesn’t commit to a certain style until we give the developer the ‘ok’ to do it.

Interested in Learning More About this Job?

If you are interested, please email us at contact@dreamspike.com. Be advised that we will not reply to forum posts or private messages. In your email, tell us about yourself. You should attach a resume, a cover letter, links to previous projects, and anything else that will help us learn about you. The more information you provide about your previous experience, the better your chances of being selected. We need to know what projects you have been involved in, how long you’ve worked on them, and what the results look like.

 
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Nice ad, and the work sounds interesting, I just have two comments:

1) $2000 isn’t much for what you apparently expect to be 6 months of work. Would you survive for 6 months on $2000?

2) Talented programmers who can also do professional graphics and sound effects are awesome, and awesomely rare. You might have more success splitting the tasks between the appropriate specialists. There will be more coordination needed on your part but hiring the right people will likely be easier in the long run than finding that one man army who can do it all alone.

 
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No profesional gona work on this large custom project providing all arts-code-sounds on your high expectation , he hase better chance to sell it on fgl for x3 the money if he dose it good and without having someone to boss him around

 
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This is 6 months of part-time work, a few hours a day. We are not hiring a full time employee.

 
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Originally posted by Alexander311:

This is 6 months of part-time work, a few hours a day. We are not hiring a full time employee.

How many hours a day you expect them to work has nothing to do with the high expectations and massive load of work you want to hire a single person to do. On top of that, you’re only offering $2000 for the completion of the project that will take “a few of hours a day” for six months..

Even for only 2 hours a day (the smallest interpretation of “a few”) that works out to just under $6 an hour. That’s less than minimum wage.

For $2000, you might be able to get a decent developer to work on your project for a month or two, not six and on top of that it looks like you want to retain full control of the rights to the game as well which makes your offer worth even less.

 
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If you want your offer to be accetable you scould offer those 2k only for code or only for arts

 
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Offer seems reasonable to me, it’s a guaranteed upfront payment with very little risk on the programmer side. You would get a better game if you provided the art/sound assets though, because programmer art is not usually very good.

 
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Seems pretty funny that you’re all quibbling about the fee. As if the competitive, paying game offers are pouring in to unpublished developers all the time. People are here constantly looking for partners on games with no cash incentive, then someone comes along with what appears to be one of the larger guarantees and it causes a flurry of consternation.

Here are some questions and presumptions:

• The deliverable is a web-based Flash playable game. It does not need to be optimized for mobile devices.
• A windows application already exists for this game. That is the conceptual model for the Flash version.
• None of the creative assets, (i.e., sound, graphics), from the Windows version of the game are available.
• The game is sort of a Babylonian “History of the World / Brittania”-style eurogame.

In other words, the author of the original post is providing creative direction and you are making a game for them.

Here’s the good news:
• Artist/developer/musician/writer (you) might presume full rights to the finished product or profit-sharing. Get it all in writing (and agree to regular audits).
• The client has a history of game publishing and may be able to provide sales reports of their previous titles.
• Given the unlikeliness of a single individual having all of the skills the client requires, the client should be providing more resources… a project manager, at least.

Here’s my warning for the publisher and candidate:
• Be careful with the NDA
• Be careful with non-competes
• Be careful with copyrights, (your own and others’)

This could be a very good project for someone interested in getting into professional game development. I would DEFINITELY work on building a relationship with the individual(s) behind DreamSpike and look for a comfortable, collaborative fit.

Considering money: If you spend one day a week working on this, you’re getting paid $76 an hour. That seems pretty good to me. A better way to structure the billing of this project is to offer an hourly rate, (say, $20), with either party able to immediately cancel their agreement at any time, for any reason, at 4-hour intervals. That allows constant reviews and monitoring, but prevents the developer from constantly changing the goal line, or requiring unreasonable changes.

 
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Originally posted by petesahooligan:

Considering money: If you spend one day a week working on this, you’re getting paid $76 an hour. That seems pretty good to me. A better way to structure the billing of this project is to offer an hourly rate, (say, $20), with either party able to immediately cancel their agreement at any time, for any reason, at 4-hour intervals. That allows constant reviews and monitoring, but prevents the developer from constantly changing the goal line, or requiring unreasonable changes.

One year = 52 weeks, so 6 months = 26 weeks.
$2000 for 6 months = $77 / week.
Assuming you’re spending one hour a week on the project you’re being paid $77/hour. If you can complete the project in 26 hours of work, sure, it’s a good deal. If you need to spend 260 hours, on the other hand, you’re only getting paid $7.7/hour, and that includes no benefits of any kind, no health insurance, no vacation time, no unemployment insurance, no retirement plan, nothing.
I spare you the calculation if you want to make this a part-time occupation at 20h/week, you got the gist of how dismal the results are going to be, for US-based programmers at least. If you live in Somalia or Haiti, though, it might be possible to make it work.