Royalty-Free Game Music Library and Custom Audio

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http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/

My name is Andrew Riley, independent composer at Lucky Lion Studios. I’ve created a Royalty-Free Video Game Music Library with 160 songs available for purchase and immediate download.

I am also available for custom audio requests. Please fill out the form found on the website – I can work with most styles.

For select samples of custom audio and published works, please see the portfolio section.

 
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The library has been updated with 10 more songs, bringing the total to 125 songs.

I’m also available for custom music requests – http://luckylionstudios.com/custom-audio/

 
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And another 10 songs brings the total to 135 – http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/

 
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Do you have anything oriented towards puzzle games or music that is truly “background” music to fit a metallic technological feel?

 
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The song Beakers was originally written as background music for a light hearted puzzle game with a somewhat technological setting. It has some electronic elements, and metallic percussion.

There are quite a few “darker” songs with an industrial/metallic vibe that are also simplistic and intended as background music, such as “Gravity” / ‘Endal" / "Time’s Pulse" / “Black Diamond” – and several 8-bit tracks if that’s more your thing.

 
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Wow these are really high quality.

 
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Thank you very much!

The royalty-free library has been updated with 5 new tracks, bringing the total to 140.

http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/

The new songs:

The Egg Commotion: upbeat/orchestral/adventure
Oolong Kong: 8-bit/adventure
Blackwood: ambient/mood
Wristbands: beat/piano
A Lost Wish: ambient/calm

 
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Thank you, from us other composers, truly,

I mean, it’s hard enough to convince the dev team that their sound team deserves a cut of the revenue from the game. Now instead we get this great new system! 115 songs, figuring each song takes 2 hours to make (assuming they are not generic copypasta chord progressions with fancy MIDI), that’s a smooth 230 hours of work.

So if one’s music is used in a nice 46 games, one gets compensated a dollar for each hour of work. 46 games.

It’ll also be amazing when the same music can be found in game after game.

Yes, this is the future of music. Not respected? MAKE IT WORSE!

 
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Originally posted by NichiS:

Thank you, from us other composers, truly,

I mean, it’s hard enough to convince the dev team that their sound team deserves a cut of the revenue from the game. Now instead we get this great new system! 115 songs, figuring each song takes 2 hours to make (assuming they are not generic copypasta chord progressions with fancy MIDI), that’s a smooth 230 hours of work.

So if one’s music is used in a nice 46 games, one gets compensated a dollar for each hour of work. 46 games.

It’ll also be amazing when the same music can be found in game after game.

Yes, this is the future of music. Not respected? MAKE IT WORSE!

It’s a perfectly legit business model. Artists and programmers do the same thing. Think about it. An independent programmer can spend years working on a single application that she turns around and sells for $10 to the customer. In the case of software, people aren’t usually willing to pay $200,000 just to ensure exclusivity rights. So the only viable business model for the programmer is to distribute the development cost across all of the customers. It’s a great deal for the customers – they get to pay $10 for $200,000 worth of work (though they don’t usually think of it that way…).

You’ve chosen to ignore the essence of the strategy here. Try your math this way – one song he composed, taking him 2 hours, might be sold 46 times, netting him $230.

 
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Thanks, Andersonalex. You hit the nail on the head.

NichiS – if you’re interested in having a serious discussion on the business model and general purpose of the library (minus the outrage and sarcasm), I’d be happy to.

The royalty-free library has been updated with 5 new tracks, bringing the total to 145.
http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/
Paypal has also been added as a payment method.

 
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Five new songs added to the royalty-free library (150 total):
http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/

Gaelport: Adventure/RPG
Moving Mountains: 16-bit/RPG
Erzsebet: Electronic/Horror
Goodnight Eleanor: Epic/Mood
Like the Wind: Action/Adventure

 
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The royalty-free library has undergone a massive overhaul, with 10 new songs added, and a slew of new features.
http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/

What’s new:

Click-to-play: to play the song’s preview, simply click on the name of the song in the library.
Playlists: select one or more genre tags from the top of the library to display only the songs that have been tagged with the selected genres.
Continuous playback: the next song in the library will now automatically play when the current track ends, so you’re free to pick the tags of your choice, press play and try out your game to see what works best.
Improved layout reduces loading times and keeps all 160 songs on a single page.
10 songs added: the top ten songs in the library were recently added (the library sorts tracks in order of the date they were added by default, so the newest tracks will always appear at the top).

 
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I concede the fact that your system markets these songs well to independent game producers, but you lack one thing: Quality.

While none of us composers are John Williams, (and please don’t take this negatively) these songs aren’t worth above $2 or $3.

I would suggest adding a quality meter to each song, relating to the consumer, which songs sound better than others (And yes, I realize that 8-bit songs are not supposed to sound good, but still some of them are pretty bad.)

 
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SWfreakonomik: I respect your right to an opinion, but couldn’t possibly disagree with it more. A one time, royalty-free payment of $5-10 is absolutely affordable and reasonable for any developer of any age. While I understand that your post was effectively made belittle the quality of my music, your personal denouncement is not absolute, and the market shows that not everyone agrees with you.
Unfortunately, your own portfolio appears to consist of one classical song, which doesn’t serve too well to open my eyes to what a quality video game library should sound like, but if you have a personal diverse body of work to share (fitting for all genres of games, from retro platformers to children’s education apps to role-playing games), I’d be all ears.

Five new songs added to the royalty-free library (165 total):

http://luckylionstudios.com/royalty-free-video-game-music-library/

Ever Away: Calm/Adventure
Until The End: Orchestral/Dungeon
Trenches: Action/Industrial
Facing Danger: Action/RPG
Seafoam Sails: Adventure/Theme