THe rise of oil prices page 2

53 posts

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Originally posted by scoopolard:

The South has got some of the lowest gas prices (no, Florida does not count) in the nation. That doesn’t surprise me though. What does surprise me is the price of oil in Alaska…why so high?

From what I understand, California has had some pretty decent oil wells offshore, if they would have been willing to drill. I think too many regulations (?) might have prohibited that, thus it’s mostly imported.

 
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Originally posted by jhco50:

The natural gas truck.

http://www.greencarcongress.com/2012/03/ramcng-20120306.html

Thanks for the link…

CNG-only range is estimated to be 255 miles, while the backup supply of gasoline extends the range to 367 total miles.

The CNG tanks provide a gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) of 18.2 gallons, there is an 8 gallon gasoline tank.

That gives a combined 14MPGe… somewhat different to the 104MPG you mentioned earlier… or was that a typo?

 
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Gasoline & crude are so essential to the American economy that such energy sources should not be controlled by the common market. It should be made a utility same as electricity, etc. and have controls that will ensure stabilization and keep insane profits out of the hands of assholes oil barons who manipulate America for their own greedy ends.

It really IS just that simple.

 
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Originally posted by karmakoolkid:

It should be made a utility same as electricity, etc. and have controls that will ensure stabilization and keep insane profits out of the hands of assholes oil barons who manipulate America for their own greedy ends.

Now there’s an idea. I never thought of gas as a utility, but we need it almost as much (more in some cases) than utilities. Just imagine how screwed we could be if we only had one electrical/gas provider—a captive audience for them—and there were no regulations to keep them under control.

 
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Because we should probably be educated on the basics before blaming the pinkos…

SOURCE

 
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Originally posted by donseptico:
Originally posted by jhco50:

The natural gas truck.

http://www.greencarcongress.com/2012/03/ramcng-20120306.html

Thanks for the link…

CNG-only range is estimated to be 255 miles, while the backup supply of gasoline extends the range to 367 total miles.

The CNG tanks provide a gasoline gallon equivalent (GGE) of 18.2 gallons, there is an 8 gallon gasoline tank.

That gives a combined 14MPGe… somewhat different to the 104MPG you mentioned earlier… or was that a typo?

No, that wasn’t a typo. I remember a time when people were converting their vehicles to propane. They seemed to work pretty well. Many of your forklifts and those kinds of equipment are propane even now.

 
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Originally posted by softest_voice:

Because we should probably be educated on the basics before blaming the pinkos…

SOURCE

I think there are many this side of the Atlantic who would kill for such cheap fuel! Compare

 
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Oh for sure don. The oil and gas prices being paid in Europe are ridiculous!
I was just pointing out that, at least here in the US, the majority of oil/gas costs are due to market speculation, NOT taxes, as some had suggested.
In Europe, on the other hand, it would appear to be the opposite, with taxes/VAT making up the bulk of costs.

 
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Originally posted by softest_voice:

Oh for sure don. The oil and gas prices being paid in Europe are ridiculous!
I was just pointing out that, at least here in the US, the majority of oil/gas costs are due to market speculation, NOT taxes, as some had suggested.
In Europe, on the other hand, it would appear to be the opposite, with taxes/VAT making up the bulk of costs.

I can remember my dad being scandalised when the price of petrol went up to 5 shillings (25p) a gallon. I can’t imagine what he would make of today’s prices.

Now this won’t go down well, but I’m not so sure that the prices over here are that ridiculous. Oil and gas are diminishing resources, and I’m increasingly coming to the conclusion that they should be taxed as such. However good we get at pumping them out of the ground, they will eventually run out or become too inaccessible (geologically or politically) to be economically viable. On top of that, Europe is far too reliant on the Russians for our gas supply. If they ever decided to shut down the pipelines, we would all be in serious trouble overnight. They have already used that tactic as a political weapon against Ukraine, and western Europe felt the fallout from that dispute.

I know I’m drifting a bit off topic here, but high rices at the petrol pumps are a constant reminder to everybody of the need to find and finance viable alternatives. My own feeling is that we’re in danger of ignoring this problem until it becomes a crisis.

 
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If i could bike or walk around with all my stuff, i’d be happy to do that. Might meet some people on the street. Shame the ‘burbs ain’t built for that…

 
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Originally posted by chuckles33:

If i could bike or walk around with all my stuff, i’d be happy to do that. Might meet some people on the street. Shame the ‘burbs ain’t built for that…

How’s your place not good for biking? Do you live in the middle of highways or something?

 
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Originally posted by softest_voice:

Oh for sure don. The oil and gas prices being paid in Europe are ridiculous!

On the other hand, most European countries have functioning public transport networks throughout and between the cities. At least here in Germany, a big part of the taxes on gas is explicitly there to encourage using PT rather than everyone driving in their own car. That kind of policy is unrealistic in the US, where public transport is treated more as a novelty item than a viable way of travelling by both the governments and the people (the exception being New York).

 
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Yeah, there are a couple of major metropolitan areas in the States with truly “good” public transportation, but even some of the big cities/areas are lacking.
I grew up in South Florida, where public transport was pretty good. I never needed to buy a car until I moved to Texas.

 
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I would ask you what area of Texas you are in, but you don’t have to answer if you don’t want to. My stepfather and mother moved to East Texas while I was in the military. My mother hates it there, but the brothers and sisters seem to like it. I have a daughter in San Antonio.

 
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Originally moved to a suburb of San Antonio in 98, far enough North (yet still part of the city) that it hadn’t gotten any sort of public transit yet. Was taking cabs everywhere for about 2 months until I could find a car in decent shape for the right price.
Austin after about 8 years in San Antonio, but only briefly while the then-girlfriend was finishing grad school. Transit was pretty good there, but I’m now outside of Austin where, even if I wanted to ditch the car, it wouldn’t be feasible.

 
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That is cool. SanAntonioSpurs is in San Antonio. My son-in-law and daughter live near Lackland AFB. She is ok living there but would rather be home. She is pretty homesick right now. Austin is a beautiful city to live in. Texas has a lot of open country and of course a car is mandatory if you go outside a city. I always got a kick out of the youngsters. They always wanted a first pickup rather than their first car. :)

 
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I think that those people with long way to work have to start using public transport more because going with own car would be too expensive. If people use more public transport, there would be less CO2 released and that could slow the global warming a bit. But it could be a bad thing in some other countries where public transport is expensive. Like in Finland. I think 5€ for 20km with the bus is too much, if you have to use public transport everyday.

 
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Originally posted by norumaru:
Originally posted by softest_voice:

Oh for sure don. The oil and gas prices being paid in Europe are ridiculous!

On the other hand, most European countries have functioning public transport networks throughout and between the cities. At least here in Germany, a big part of the taxes on gas is explicitly there to encourage using PT rather than everyone driving in their own car. That kind of policy is unrealistic in the US, where public transport is treated more as a novelty item than a viable way of travelling by both the governments and the people (the exception being New York).

Yeah, as long as we’ve got fuel, we’ll continue our current path of sprawl.
The consumerist culture is a very shortsighted one, sometimes. Most attempts to implement public transportation have failed. Houston has a light rail system that’s, well, very light. I don’t think Houston or LA could ever have a decent PT system- they’re to big, which is the real problem with American cities. To big for PT. Not enough room, or to expensive, to build things like rail networks.

 
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This is all true 1132. States and especially cities don’t have the millions to billions to build PT, even if they had the room. My wife drives 17 miles one way and then back every weekday. I’m a bit worried as to how long she can keep doing that before gas costs more than she makes.

The smaller government entities can’t even afford to keep up the streets we have right now.

 
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Originally posted by 1132:

Yeah, as long as we’ve got fuel, we’ll continue our current path of sprawl.
The consumerist culture is a very shortsighted one, sometimes. Most attempts to implement public transportation have failed. Houston has a light rail system that’s, well, very light. I don’t think Houston or LA could ever have a decent PT system- they’re to big, which is the real problem with American cities. To big for PT. Not enough room, or to expensive, to build things like rail networks.

From the little information I can find on the net from a quick search, Houston is, approximately the same size as London (circa 600 sq. miles) although London has approximately 3 times the population at 7.5 Million.

I’m not saying London’s public transport is perfect by any means – with such a large population it’s often overcrowded, etc but it’s perfectly feasible for Houston, or any similar sized city, to have a reasonable PT system (be that trams, buses, trains or, more likely, a combination of these and others).

Rail is certainly very expensive, especially underground, but buses are relatively cheap to buy, run and maintain. Trams only require a groove in the road and, possibly, some overhead cabling. Both of which could be achieved for far less than the cost of building more roads and car parks ;)

@jhco – sounds like it’s time to get a smaller car :P (34 miles would be about half a gallon in a typical, reasonably modern, European or Japanese vehicle)

 
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She drives a little Sonoma pickup. It still costs about 30-40 dollars a week, depending on her outside activities.

 
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Originally posted by jhco50:

She drives a little Sonoma pickup. It still costs about 30-40 dollars a week, depending on her outside activities.

That sounds like about $150-$160 per month, and if she makes between 2-3K per month (as most decent jobs do), you probably don’t have anything to worry about for awhile.

 
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How much do you think Wallyworld pays it’s employees?

 
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min wage? $7.25/hr ish ($1100 or so a month)

 
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On the money Don. You must work for Wally. :) Now I must admit, my wife makes a bit more, but she has been with them for 21 years…a glutton for punishment. Also, they don’t like to have full time people as they would then have to pay amenities like insurance. They still have some of the older full time employees but as the leave they go for the part time only people. My older daughter works there too and she has been with them for about 10 years I believe. My wife just got a dollar an hour raise because she became what they call the lead person over 3 departments. She had been the lead person (manager) over the jewelry dept for a few years now. They don’t like to call them managers because that demands a position. Hard to explain that and I’m not sure if she would be considered a manager or not in her new position. She will be managing jewelry, accessories, and shoes now. This is about all I know of the new structure of a store.