Poverty page 4

103 posts

Flag Post
Originally posted by jhco50:

You are not in survival mode, youngun’. Look around you and you will see your wealth and it isn’t monetary. Being wealthy is not a panecea for happyness, in fact wealthy people are many times unhappy. They have given up a happy family for money and what do they have. A dysfunctional family, a Rolls Royce. You call that being happy?

Um, ‘old curmudgeon’, you just missed the point I was trying to make completely. Not surprising I guess. Although having been through very tough times yourself it’s disappointing you don’t see the hypocrisy in your actions.

 
Flag Post

I know what you are trying to say, but you are not in as bad a shape as you think you are. You may not be able to go shopping on a whim or live in a big fancy house, but I’m pretty sure you have a wonderful family who love you for you. Money is nice and it doesn’t hurt to have some to be comfortable, but money is not everything to life. Yes, I have had bad times and worked out of them just as you will. But the bad times make you tougher. “Old Curmudgeon”? :)

 
Flag Post

I don’t think you do fully understand what me or other people are trying to say when we say these things, and the original comment wasn’t addressed to you anyway, it was towards CoolGuy who actually might listen and consider it.

My husband almost died earlier this year from a pulmonary embolism, and might very well be dead within the next twenty years if his health continues this way. Medicaid (and food stamps), in their infinite wisdom, just pulled our medical benefits effective the end of this month because my disability got raised by $200 effing dollars, so now we are scrambling for health insurance to cover all of us, including my 10 year old daughter. We make less than you do and have more expenses. This is what I call survival mode, when you’re literally not sure everyone in your family will actually survive.

But what do you care, if it’s not your problem? It’s easy for you to sit in your currently comfortable position and pass judgment on those going through tough times, but that behavior doesn’t become you, and wouldn’t become anyone else either. It just shows a lack of empathy.

 
Flag Post

Me thinks you are over-reacting. I have spent many years without medical insurance in my lifetime. I am not without empathy and I know you are upset right now. It will get better and I’m betting your husband will not be dead in 20 years. In fact, I’m betting if he has a severe medical emergency his family will be there to help. Same with your daughter. I’m not talking about going to the doctor for the common cold or minor things like that, but something severe. Do not judge all families by other families who attach strings to everything. The fact is, I know someone who paid for their oldest granddaughter’s doctor bills Christmas before last.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by jhco50:

Me thinks you are over-reacting. .

I don’t think so.

I have spent many years without medical insurance in my lifetime.

I don’t care. This is our specific situation and our problems right now.

It will get better and I’m betting your husband will not be dead in 20 years..

Who knows. His health is shit and he’s barely 40. One thing is certain—your glib comments don’t make anything better, you don’t walk in other people’s shoes.

In fact, I’m betting if he has a severe medical emergency his family will be there to help..

Yeah, I don’t think they will. They don’t have any money, or at least never spared any for us, anyway.

Do not judge all families by other families who attach strings to everything..

Whatever that means.

The fact is, I know someone who paid for their oldest granddaughter’s doctor bills Christmas before last.

People need health insurance. They can’t go around paying for retail hospital bills and if you think they can, you’re dumb. My husband’s recent four day stay for the embolism came to over $30,000 and that’s actually cheap.

 
Flag Post

Well, it is true, your situation is your situation. Don’t bite everyone around you because you are upset. It might be that your family doesn’t just hand out money for the hell of it, but might be there when really needed. Yes, insurance is a good thing to have, I won’t argue that. My glib comments weren’t meant to make it all go away. They were meant to let you know that real need can pull families together in an emergency. There is a difference between wanting the family to support everyday needs or wants and an emergency.

I know what real medical emergencies are after experiencing a heart attack with by-pass surgery, gall bladder removal after it has died and turned gangrene, back surgery, etc. Yet, I am still kicking and walking upright. In fact, I am still working in my houses. I feel pretty confident your husbands health is not shit. Yes, he has had a few setbacks, but he is not a candidate for the morgue.

Now, we are quite a ways off topic, can we get back to the discussion?

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by BobTheCoolGuy:
Originally posted by karmakoolkid:
Originally posted by BobTheCoolGuy:

Simply, that I feel the 99% should be very appreciative of what they do have.

I guess he would also say the antebellum South slaves should have been ""very appreciative"" that they had shacks to live in. I can’t help but wonder if Bob has a true grasp of just how bad life is for those at the lower ends of that sliding scale. Esp. if we understand that this scale is represented by a pyramid…w/ the base of it being the “poverty” thing this thread is about.

Bob, I'm disappointed here. I expect more than this from ya. Instead, ya offer what I would expect from jhco.
What?
WHAT? .... What what? I made my point very clear.
Yes, a small minority of those people in the 99% live in abject poverty, and yes they do need help.

Since ya're satisfied to include ALL OF THE 99% as being ""should be very appreciative of what they do have"" sans this ""small minority who live in abject poverty....I'm guessing ya think there is this Hhhhuuuggge gap between these two "groups" of the 99%. In FACT, there is NO GAP....rather a simple SLIDING PROGRESSION that is well represented by a very skewed "bell-shaped-curve" (my earlier "pyramid" design over-simplified the huge disparative of the top 1% & the (simingly?) "gap" between them & the 99%....the "inequality of incomes":http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Income_inequality_in_the_United_States.

This skewed "bell-shaped-curve" is shown w/ the x axis (horizontal) representing $$$$$ and the y axis (verticle) representing numbers of ppl. Yes, of course, (on the left of the horizontal) the "abject-poverty-ppl" are not only small of income, but are also small in numbers (as indicated by not being very far up on the y axis).

BUT, this left side of the bell-curve rises extremly fast...indicating more-&-more ppl who STILL HAVE relatively small incomes. The curve then become somewhat more typical of the actual symetrical bell-curve in representing the "middle-class",,,,w/ the numbers (of the 99%) being more typcial. HOWEVER, this whole part of the bell-curve (the vast numbers of middle-class) has dramatically shifted to the left...indicating a large reduction of income (the x axis). And, the right side of it also drops just as dramticaly as the right one rises....a rapid falling off of numbers of moderately "elevated" income of the middle class.

In a closed system being represented by the bell-curve, this shifting of the great majority of numbers of income to the left (smaller amount of income) has to result in this over all money (income) going somewhere. It obviously goes to the "right" on the curve and shoots a looooonnngggg way towards the extreme income (x axis) area of the bell-curve...w/ the height (y axis),, representing numbers of ppl,, being very low (few ppl earning these huge incomes).

My original pyramid is still (mostly?) valid. I wish I knew how to show ya what I'm gonna ask ppl to see. Alas, I will depend on my (poor?) ability to visualize & others ability to "see" it. First, rotate the bell-curve 90 degrees so that the income is now on the y axis (vertical & to the left of this axis) w/ the high income being at the top and the poverty incomes being at the bottom. Now, "fold over" (like opening a book) the curve to the right--using the y axis as the center of the "fold". This ends up looking somewhat like a "Hershey's Kiss":http://www.hersheys.com/kisses/products.aspx#/KISSES-Milk-Chocolate

This "mirror image" of the curve--w/ the bottom of it being the "poor" and the top of it being the rich--actually does have the appearance of a pyramid....just not the Egyption ones. Instead, those "poverty-people" are so few in comparison to the numbers of increasing income rising so fast (almost straight line)...that, while the base of my "pyramid" isn't flat, this little "dangling tail" of poor incomes is hardly noticable

The middle incomes then appear as a typical base of a skewed pyramid....the Hershey's Kiss. What is glaringly noticeable is how obscenely skewed this pyramid ever so rapidly develops a narrowing pinnacle that rises (increasing income) insanely to great heights--the 1%.

I'll address the blance of your post later, this one is now insanely looonnngg...lol

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by jhco50:

You are not in survival mode, youngun’. Look around you and you will see your wealth and it isn’t monetary. Being wealthy is not a panecea for happyness, in fact wealthy people are many times unhappy. They have given up a happy family for money and what do they have. A dysfunctional family, a Rolls Royce. You call that being happy?

honestly, it doesn’t sound like you’ve ever been really poor. i know you’re trying to be nice to someone, and there’s a degree of truth to what you’re saying no doubt, but if you’re really poor all of that becomes quite irrelevant.

I’m betting your husband will not be dead in 20 years

that’s one of those things you probably shouldn’t say unless you know what you’re talking about.


anyway, stories like that shows very dramatically what the difference is between the US and Europe.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Twilight_Ninja:

I don’t think you do fully understand what me or other people are trying to say when we say these things, and the original comment wasn’t addressed to you anyway, it was towards CoolGuy who actually might listen and consider it.

My husband almost died earlier this year from a pulmonary embolism, and might very well be dead within the next twenty years if his health continues this way. Medicaid (and food stamps), in their infinite wisdom, just pulled our medical benefits effective the end of this month because my disability got raised by $200 effing dollars, so now we are scrambling for health insurance to cover all of us, including my 10 year old daughter. We make less than you do and have more expenses. This is what I call survival mode, when you’re literally not sure everyone in your family will actually survive.

But what do you care, if it’s not your problem? It’s easy for you to sit in your currently comfortable position and pass judgment on those going through tough times, but that behavior doesn’t become you, and wouldn’t become anyone else either. It just shows a lack of empathy.

Obviously I don’t know your whole life story or anything, but sounds like rough times – hope your husband’s health improves. And yes, I do think a husband with health problems and a lack of a way to pay for needed health care is survival mode. Plus, you’re a mother, which means anything that could harm/hurt your children puts you on extreme edge (as it should).

@karma I don’t think there is a distinct gap between 99% and 1%, and thus even more reason not to create those labels. I’d say more but I need another nap :D

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by OmegaDoom:
Originally posted by jhco50:

You are not in survival mode, youngun’. Look around you and you will see your wealth and it isn’t monetary. Being wealthy is not a panecea for happyness, in fact wealthy people are many times unhappy. They have given up a happy family for money and what do they have. A dysfunctional family, a Rolls Royce. You call that being happy?

honestly, it doesn’t sound like you’ve ever been really poor. i know you’re trying to be nice to someone, and there’s a degree of truth to what you’re saying no doubt, but if you’re really poor all of that becomes quite irrelevant.

I’m betting your husband will not be dead in 20 years

that’s one of those things you probably shouldn’t say unless you know what you’re talking about.


anyway, stories like that shows very dramatically what the difference is between the US and Europe.

Yes, I have been so poor I wondered where our next meal would come from. I have been on the bottom and had to climb out. It is doable, believe me.

And yes, I know what I’m talking about.

@Karma, If you turn that graph one more time and fold it another two times you will come up with a parallelogram. Seriously, there is some truth about the middle class moving more toward the poverty side, but not completely. I have to agree with Bob that the truly poverty ridden people are a small minority.

 
Flag Post

The problem is that health care is so expensive. There are two areas where costs have been skyrocketing in recent decades, and have been killing the middle class – health care and higher education. Not coincidentally, those are two sectors the government heavily subsidizes, and most people don’t pay out-of-pocket. It should be pretty obvious why this happens. When people don’t pay themselves, they aren’t nearly as careful about costs. A person might go to the hospital for something and not have the slightest idea how much his insurance company paid for it – but if it’s anything beyond a checkup, the bill was probably in the thousands.

Health care in the US is neither free market nor socialist – it’s sort of a bastardized combination of the two, in a way that loses many of the key advantages of an unhampered free market, and in some ways in even worse than pure socialism (particularly the cost to those people who do wind up having to pay for something major out-of-pocket). What we have wound up is basically a government-protected cartel. Anyone who has the slightest notion of how markets works should be thinking “A government-protected cartel? Won’t they charge very high prices?” Yup.

In higher education, there is a bubble going on that I think is unsustainable; at the same time that new technology like the internet is threatening to make traditional colleges far less necessary. There’s sort of a cycle, where government subsidizes higher education. Student’s demand schedules (the amount they’re willing to pay for) haven’t changed; so they treat the money not paid by them as if it were a given. The universities can get away with raising tuition, so they do. Government increases subsidies to help students with the higher tuitions. Rinse and repeat.

 
Flag Post

Aaron, that post is so accurate. People who are on public assistance such as medicaid do go to the doctor for anything, such as the sniffles, because they don’t have to pay for it. They don’t realize that it isn’t free, someone has to pay for it.

Both insurance and government have had a hand in raising medical costs. Insurance companies tend to try to undercut what a doctor or hospital would normally charge and to get the money the medical community needs to survive raise their prices to compensate. This is why a person who doesn’t have insurance can actually get cheaper rates if they pay cash.

Government is exactly what you are talking about. Government will dole out whatever amount is asked for because it is not their money, it is the taxpayers. Government spends without any thought of conserving whatsoever, raising costs.

Schools are hard to explain, they get tuition from the students plus government subsidies. Most people don’t understand were the monies go, but it isn’t to the students who are paying through the nose, but to the educators who demand high wages and bonuses.

 
Flag Post

Yes, I have been so poor I wondered where our next meal would come from. I have been on the bottom and had to climb out. It is doable, believe me.

You are a case study. It really doesn’t apply to the majority.

 
Flag Post

Actually Dark, I feel anyone can do it. I am not special other than being stubborn. I chose not to be down and out and made up my mind to pick myself up by my bootstraps. It was not easy, but it was doable. That is what is so great about this country.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by jhco50:

Actually Dark, I feel anyone can do it. I am not special other than being stubborn. I chose not to be down and out and made up my mind to pick myself up by my bootstraps. It was not easy, but it was doable. That is what is so great about this country.

Pulling yourself up by your bootstraps is most doable with someone else’s help, which you had. Not everyone’s as fortunate as you were.

 
Flag Post

I feel anyone can do it.

Sigh, you realise you’re proving my point, right? But even so, the fact that it took you long years before you’re out of the critical level should show that being poor is vastly different from being rich.

I chose not to be down and out and made up my mind to pick myself up by my bootstraps.

I know enough poor people that choose “not to be down” and work hard, but that doesn’t mean they’ve become rich. If you’re lucky to get a dreamjob with a high salary, you’ll be out of there in no time, but otherwise you likely won’t get up high.

 
Flag Post
The problem is that health care is so expensive. There are two areas where costs have been skyrocketing in recent decades, and have been killing the middle class – health care and higher education. Not coincidentally, those are two sectors the government heavily subsidizes, and most people don’t pay out-of-pocket. It should be pretty obvious why this happens. When people don’t pay themselves, they aren’t nearly as careful about costs. A person might go to the hospital for something and not have the slightest idea how much his insurance company paid for it – but if it’s anything beyond a checkup, the bill was probably in the thousands.

that’s false relations. you’re saying because people don’t pay themselves, then because of the lack of incentive to not overpay, too much money will be payed. fair argument. but you used that as an explanation for why, where they do have to pay out of their own pocket, have to pay so much for it.

i don’t see how that argument works for that.

also by the order of presentation, you managed to clearly imply it’s the subsidation itself that causes health and education to be so expensive, when it’s in no way shown it isn’t the opposite, while the opposite (costs being that high because it’s not actually socialized) when looking at the stats seem much more assumable.

all industrialised nations other than the US have socialised health and education. none pay nearly as much as the US on health care (the US pays roughly the same in taxes, and double that cost after adding private costs). most or all Western nations have better health.

all your arguments were really good points, but your preceding conclusions in the first paragraph didn’t exactly follow logically.

 
Flag Post

Twilight, it is always doable, but you must be able to determine how to do it. Yes, I guess you could say I had help with Texas sending me to college. However, I had a pell grant to go with it and I worked my free time from college at a grocery store. We drove 35 miles one way to accomplish this as well. All of this was happening while I was still recovering from back surgery.

I have only had one panic attack in my life and that was when all of this was happening. I cannot really explain a panic attack but I can say once is enough. We had bought a house in Zavalla (a mistake I believe) and this was extremely small for a family of five. Food was almost a luxury. My wife worked at Walmart at minimum wage. While my wife worked and I went to school, we tried to accommodate college for our two older children. No insurance so if we had a mishap we were on our own…and we did have a couple.

We worked hard to accomplish what we did. It was not easy, but it was necessary in our eyes. You might find this surprising, but my wife is every bit as aggressive as I am when the chips are down.

We had not totally recovered when my wife’s father died. I had finished college and the older children had moved out. My wife and I decided she would move to where we are now and I stayed behind to let her get established and let my youngest daughter finish that year of schooling. We followed up after school. My wife drove my pickup, loaded down when she left and I followed driving an old Hippy Van I paid $50 for and a horse trailer behind it.

That is the perseverance we had to pull ourselves back up. It was hard, but we did it. My wife had transfered and was working at Walmart and I started serching for a job. Eventually I landed a good one and we were off from there.

I would add that you are in an excellent position to pull yourself up. You have a college education, your husband will be finished with his college in a couple of years and both of you can get good jobs. In fact, you have the education now that could jump your lifestyle up a few notches. I can only suggest you go get the job you are trained for.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by jhco50:


I have only had one panic attack in my life and that was when all of this was happening. I cannot really explain a panic attack but I can say once is enough.

Yes, I know what they are like. Myself and my family have experienced them.

We had bought a house in Zavalla (a mistake I believe) and this was extremely small for a family of five. Food was almost a luxury. My wife worked at Walmart at minimum wage. While my wife worked and I went to school, we tried to accommodate college for our two older children. No insurance so if we had a mishap we were on our own…and we did have a couple.

Just out of curiosity, did you guys consider going to food closets in the local area? I was at a social services office the other day and I saw a small family loading canned goods (with their vouchers) from the garage there. I’m sure this is based on community donations, because I’ve donated goods like this to charities myself. Also, whatever kids of yours were going to college would have been best served by collecting Pell Grants and starting at community college. That would ensure they could make ends meet (as for tuition), at least until they reached university.

We worked hard to accomplish what we did. It was not easy, but it was necessary in our eyes. You might find this surprising, but my wife is every bit as aggressive as I am when the chips are down.

I don’t know what you mean when you say she is aggressive.

I would add that you are in an excellent position to pull yourself up. You have a college education, your husband will be finished with his college in a couple of years and both of you can get good jobs. In fact, you have the education now that could jump your lifestyle up a few notches. I can only suggest you go get the job you are trained for.

Yeah, except you often shoot from your lip without knowing all of the variables of which you speak. You haven’t thought it out completely; I have. My husband is having problems falling behind in school, not just because the subject matter is hard, but because he started out the semester with a pulmonary embolism/hospital stay, and promptly followed it up with the flu and breathing problems. He might pass, he might not. If he doesn’t pass, then that delays his graduation a year (these engineering classes only start once a year and are prerequisites to future classes), so it gives us a gap we can’t really account for with other than small local jobs. He is also not willing to transfer schools at this time, he seems to have an attachment to this particular one.

My education probably could get me a decent job somewhere (in the country) and I would be willing to take it, but we are not in a position where we can move since the husband and daughter are both geographically bound by school (and local medical care with his exigent situation) right now. There is a chance I could get an IT job in the local area, but it’s a very small chance, since this is a—how do I put it delicately? Oh yeah, sexist—community, which coincidentally has the worst employment rates in all of Colorado. Denver is where the real jobs are right now.

So what will we do to get through this time? Probably get small odd jobs to make ends meet and keep spinning our wheels until his school ends one way or another. I don’t expect you to understand since you never do, and since you take a superior position to everyone else, but that’s where we’re at right now.

 
Flag Post

Omega – most people are subsidized by government, or have insurance for their health care. The systems (and prices) are designed with them in mind. The normal free market process of competition driving down prices doesn’t really apply, because of the government bans on competition Then, when the odd person comes along who does have to pay cash, they get shafted. It is completely logical if you think one step further. I can give anecdotal stories about people who shopped around and found some clinic or doctor who was prepared to take cash and offer a huge discount; but this is such an irregular thing I don’t know if there are or even can be meaningful empirical studies. We can see that areas where people pay their own money, and are less regulated – laser eye surgery and cosmetic surgery, for example – have falling rather than rising prices. We can also look at another related field – public schools. Again, paid for by government; no free market, and the people who use it don’t have to concern themselves with costs. And again, costs have been skyrocketing without a corresponding rise in quality.

The subsidizing came before the rising prices. The government takeover of medicine began about a hundred years ago, and has progressively gotten worse. The severe rise in prices has been in the last few decades. Once it started, they began to feed off each other as I described.

Some more explanation of why health care costs are so high. Parts of the health care industry such as the medical schools and the pharmaceutical industry are essentially government-protected cartels. No body other than the AMA is allowed to license doctors, and the result is that they keep the supply low in order to keep wages up. That’s the classic story of what monopolies aim to do; but it’s virtually impossible in a truly free market. When government bans competition, however, they do it; much like in the days of classical mercantilism, where the government would hand out privileges and say “you’re the only company allowed to sell X.” The reason for high costs in medicines themselves is that the FDA regulations on new drugs are so absurd that it takes over 800 million dollars to get a new drug approved; even in cases where the necessary studies have been done in other countries, or it’s derived from pre-existing drugs, and so on. They are then protected with outrageous patents. Sadly, most of the opponents of socialized medicine defend these medical patents. They are really a prime reason for ridiculously high costs, they are not free market, and I view them as wholly illegitimate.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by AaronB:

I can give anecdotal stories about people who shopped around and found some clinic or doctor who was prepared to take cash and offer a huge discount; but this is such an irregular thing I don’t know if there are or even can be meaningful empirical studies.

It’s true that that’s pretty darn rare. The closest thing I can think of to this are the low income clinics in my area, but I think they scale your prices based on your income, and again are subsidized by the community. I’m not sure they even fall in this category.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by Twilight_Ninja:
Originally posted by jhco50:


I have only had one panic attack in my life and that was when all of this was happening. I cannot really explain a panic attack but I can say once is enough.

Yes, I know what they are like. Myself and my family have experienced them.

We had bought a house in Zavalla (a mistake I believe) and this was extremely small for a family of five. Food was almost a luxury. My wife worked at Walmart at minimum wage. While my wife worked and I went to school, we tried to accommodate college for our two older children. No insurance so if we had a mishap we were on our own…and we did have a couple.

Just out of curiosity, did you guys consider going to food closets in the local area? I was at a social services office the other day and I saw a small family loading canned goods (with their vouchers) from the garage there. I’m sure this is based on community donations, because I’ve donated goods like this to charities myself. Also, whatever kids of yours were going to college would have been best served by collecting Pell Grants and starting at community college. That would ensure they could make ends meet (as for tuition), at least until they reached university.

We worked hard to accomplish what we did. It was not easy, but it was necessary in our eyes. You might find this surprising, but my wife is every bit as aggressive as I am when the chips are down.

I don’t know what you mean when you say she is aggressive.

I would add that you are in an excellent position to pull yourself up. You have a college education, your husband will be finished with his college in a couple of years and both of you can get good jobs. In fact, you have the education now that could jump your lifestyle up a few notches. I can only suggest you go get the job you are trained for.

Yeah, except you often shoot from your lip without knowing all of the variables of which you speak. You haven’t thought it out completely; I have. My husband is having problems falling behind in school, not just because the subject matter is hard, but because he started out the semester with a pulmonary embolism/hospital stay, and promptly followed it up with the flu and breathing problems. He might pass, he might not. If he doesn’t pass, then that delays his graduation a year (these engineering classes only start once a year and are prerequisites to future classes), so it gives us a gap we can’t really account for with other than small local jobs. He is also not willing to transfer schools at this time, he seems to have an attachment to this particular one.

My education probably could get me a decent job somewhere (in the country) and I would be willing to take it, but we are not in a position where we can move since the husband and daughter are both geographically bound by school (and local medical care with his exigent situation) right now. There is a chance I could get an IT job in the local area, but it’s a very small chance, since this is a—how do I put it delicately? Oh yeah, sexist—community, which coincidentally has the worst employment rates in all of Colorado. Denver is where the real jobs are right now.

So what will we do to get through this time? Probably get small odd jobs to make ends meet and keep spinning our wheels until his school ends one way or another. I don’t expect you to understand since you never do, and since you take a superior position to everyone else, but that’s where we’re at right now.

1. I wish one of those on no one.

2. No, to be honest, I didn’t even know they existed. And the area we were in probably didn’t have one anyway. I’m not sure about my son as he was acting more on his own. My oldest daughter got a pell grant I think, but after we moved they told her she had to be emancipated to receive one, even though we were in another state.

3. She worked at the same level I did to get through our circumstances.

4, I don’t know all of your circumstances, not do I want to. I know You have way more education than I will ever have when it comes to college. I don’t wish to figure out your private business, that is up to you. Your husband has had a hard time this semester, no doubt. I do know about the engineering classes and how they work. I’m guessing your husband will be taking summer classes if he can. He sounds as stubborn as me. I totally understand not wanting to stop in the middle of college and transfering to another school. It just messes everything up and he would have to repeat classes he has already taking. Also, another school might not accept his credits. I suspect he knows what he is doing.

LOL! Sexist? I hadn’t thought of that being a problem, but maybe it is in your area. I would say Denver would be the best place to find employment. I believe it is the biggest city in Colorado, right?

I would say that would be your best bet. It would offset some of the costs you might be short. I do not think you are spinning your wheels. From what I gather, you are preparing for a damn good future. You would be surprised at what I understand. I’m didn’t fall off the turnip truck this morning. I am not taking a superior position to anyone. What I have told you is why I can see where you are coming from. You can believe what I say or you can ignore it. Or you can ask your dad for his advise. I’m betting it will be similar to mine.

 
Flag Post

Twilight – they’re not exactly in that category; but at least they’re partly designed for people paying cash who are price-conscious.

 
Flag Post

Aaron,

On second thought, I do remember seeing (in a Walmart in California) a clinic staffed with one doctor who charged flat prices like $50 for an office visit and didn’t take insurance. I remember thinking it was odd, paying out of pocket like that, to say nothing of the potential referrals/medications that may result from such a visit. But it would look odd to me, since I was raised on insurance and believe in it strongly. I guess that clinic—wedged as it was between a hair salon and customer service inside Walmart—filled a specific niche.

 
Flag Post
Originally posted by jhco50:

4, I don’t know all of your circumstances, not do I want to. I know You have way more education than I will ever have when it comes to college. I don’t wish to figure out your private business, that is up to you. Your husband has had a hard time this semester, no doubt. I do know about the engineering classes and how they work. I’m guessing your husband will be taking summer classes if he can. He sounds as stubborn as me. I totally understand not wanting to stop in the middle of college and transfering to another school. It just messes everything up and he would have to repeat classes he has already taking. Also, another school might not accept his credits. I suspect he knows what he is doing.

This whole paragraph is full of misinformation, and you don’t know what you are talking about, so you should mind your own business.

Originally posted by AaronB:

No body other than the AMA is allowed to license doctors, and the result is that they keep the supply low in order to keep wages up.

Aaron, do you think the medical field is trying to keep the talent pool low but coveted, so they can charge large prices for their services? I had never considered this, but it fits in with an anomoly I’ve seen, and that is nursing. I hear a lot about the nursing career field being short on staff, and yet the number of nursing schools and the hoops people have to jump through to actually be a nurse is crazy—they’re hard as heck to get in, as well as stay in (not get kicked out for small reasons). With a career field as hurting for help as they seem to be, I always wondered why that was.