eBooks vs Real Books page 2

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I finally had the opportunity to play around with a few e-readers at a local book store. Sadly, they didn’t have a Kindle, so I couldn’t compare them to the arguably best product.
The way the text is displayed is really remarkable. There’s really no comparison to a computer screen. It feels very natural to read from those screens. And of course, the option to change the text size and the font and to have a backlight for certain situations is really useful.
But I found it a bit strange how weak the user interface was in most of the ones I tried. Even the expensive ones were very unresponsive. There was a noticeable delay when turning a page. And there also was no visual feedback when swiping across the screen. On my smartphone there usually is a little effect that pushes the current page over to tell me that I am doing it correctly. In most of the e-readers with a touch screen it sometimes took me a few attempts to turn a page.
I still preferred the touch controlled devices, though. It just felt more natural and few buttons improve the design too. Plus, some of those things had horrible button interfaces. Two different buttons that did the exact same thing, a tiny (and pretty unresponsive) set of arrow keys to browse through menus… It just looked to me like some of those companies don’t really care about ease of use and don’t test if their solutions work well. A lot of wasted potential.
But, like I said, the biggest point of criticism to me was how slow these things were. Building up pages, registering input and so on.

Again: they had no Kindle there. The products they had for testing were ones they tried to push because they have contracts with them. Contracts that don’t have anything to do with Amazon. From what I’ve read the Kindle is probably a lot better, but for now, I will read my copy of 1Q84 the traditional way. Call me crazy, but I also kind of like the feeling of carrying a 1000 page book around with me.

EDIT: Forgot to mention the reader. My favourite of the lot was the Tolino Shine. Extremely light, great shape, only three buttons (shutting it on/down, main menu, activating the backlight), agreeable controls and the mentioned input delay.

 
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I got a sony e-reader as a going away gift before heading overseas to an non-english country. At the time I figured it would be pretty useless. I’m cheap, I don’t like buying books for more than 5 bucks, which seems about average for e-books, so the only books i had downloaded were pub domain classics or novels from ‘net-friendly authors. But as it happened i ran out of real books pretty quick so i was forced to use the e-reader, and it was certainly more convenient. However, since i’ve come back I’ve only read physical books.

 
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I’m an avid reader, and while I love reading from real books, I also greatly enjoy my Kindle. I got it out of necessity (I have one room, 300+ books, 3 bookshelves… I ran out of space). That being said, I’ve not noticed any difference in my personal comprehension of books, and can still hi-lite and create notes on certain passages (almost more nicely than when I would do so in paper books).

I dislike that there is a battery life, that is limiting, but rarely am I going any place that I won’t have access to a charger at least every other day. Not to mention, my Kindle can use my phone charger, which is always a plus.

I miss the fact that I could easily share my books with others, but in reality, I’m fairly selfish and hated when people borrowed my books. They’d always dogear pages and return them in such a horrible condition than what I lent to them.

I’ve also found myself reading faster with it, due to not having pages and knowing how much is left in a book, really. Being able to change the font size means I can finally read comfortably without my glasses. I’ve never noticed any eye-strain, too. At least with my Paperwhite. It’s still the e-ink, whereas my mom’s Kindle Fire is an LCD screen which DOES give me eye-strain. (Note, you can get eye-strain reading from paper books, too. A lot of it has to do with looking away from the stimulating source for a few seconds every minute or so.)

My favorite thing about my Kindle is how quickly I can get a new book (and when I can read one or two a day at times, this is important) and being able to read one-handed/being able to put it down at a moments notice without a bookmark and picking right back up in the same spot. Oh, and not having to pack 30 books for vacation :)

 
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interesting thing about the charger – i hear people complaining about it, but i never had to charge my e-reader all that often. it could easily last a week or two of fulltime reading without being charged.

 
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I always prefer normal books. They aren’t fragile so I can throw them on the floor or in my school bag, paper has a feeling which is good and when reading from computers, my eye hurts and my head aches. My hands sweat a lot, and when I use tablet computers, they get wet and sticky after I’ve used them for some time.

Sometimes I wish I had eBooks so my back wouldn’t ache from carrying the books, but then I think, it would get broken in a week. I probably wouldn’t charge it anyway. There is enough place in my home and the school library anyway.

 
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I like books and bookcases.
I like not having to charge a book…it’s always there to be picked up and quickly skimmed with easy flicking back and forth between needed pages.
Though in favour of e-readers, I guess when having to move around the world, being able to carry your books in one easy kindle-like e-reader is a plus…but old print for me is still the winner.

 
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There’s just something about that feeling of pages turning beneath your fingertips, and the naturality of a real book that has always gotten me. Call me old fashioned, but I have never been able to adjust to the idea of e-books, and though I accept that they may be important to another person, I have always fealt like they have taken the seriousness out of the book in general, that people have started to think of them a just another thing, when to me, they may be my entire world.

The way I see it, I think that books are going to quickly diminish, and be replaced completely by all these e-books, until they eventually fade off the face of the Earth forever, and that’s a scary thought to me. Books have been around for a very long time, the truth is, e-readers have not, they may be more efficient in some cases, but in my opinion, they take the meaning out of reading in general.

 
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It definitely feels different to move pages with one’s own hand rather than through a screen but stone tablets and papyrus must have held some symbolic importance back in their days too right?

In the end the merit of a book is determined through it’s content, not the medium in which it is presented, and it just makes sense to use less space and paper using e-books rather than real books.

 
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eBooks are responsible for all of the book burning behind iron walls. You may not know it, but libraries, bookstores, etc, have been and are going through a mass book burning rampage. The worst of all is when antique valuable books are the victim. For example, a library will destroy a 100 year old manuscript of Moby Dick, then they’ll just say its not truly destroyed, its still there, but its digital. These websites will explain this issue to you in greater depth then in this short post.

http://www.cracked.com/article_19453_6-reasons-were-in-another-book-burning-period-in-history.html

http://www.cracked.com/blog/8-unexpected-downsides-switch-to-e-books_p2/

 
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I think I’ve only read a couple of ebooks and only because I was not able to get my hands on a physical copy at the time(no money, library didn’t carry it, etc). I will always prefer physical books. There’s just something nice about being able to actually hold it and turn the pages.

 
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Originally posted by DakotaDante:

eBooks are responsible for all of the book burning behind iron walls. You may not know it, but libraries, bookstores, etc, have been and are going through a mass book burning rampage. The worst of all is when antique valuable books are the victim. For example, a library will destroy a 100 year old manuscript of Moby Dick, then they’ll just say its not truly destroyed, its still there, but its digital. These websites will explain this issue to you in greater depth then in this short post.

http://www.cracked.com/article_19453_6-reasons-were-in-another-book-burning-period-in-history.html

http://www.cracked.com/blog/8-unexpected-downsides-switch-to-e-books_p2/

The 100yo scripture of Moby Dick would not be burnt, because it would be worth thousands of dollars, especially if they could prove that it is the original copy.

 
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I smell bullshit.

 
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Originally posted by DakotaDante:

I smell bullshit.

Funny.
That was my reaction to your initial post.

 
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Neither for me.