Why say G_d? page 2

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Is there a reason why it isn’t considered disrespectful to write or say Jesus then? Seems like it should be, since that too is the true name of one of the aspects of God. Does the name Jehovah (or whatever) refer to the whole trinity combined as one, or just the ‘Father’ part?

I’m still kind of interested in that.

 
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Is there a reason why it isn’t considered disrespectful to write or say Jesus then? Seems like it should be, since that too is the true name of one of the aspects of God. Does the name Jehovah (or whatever) refer to the whole trinity combined as one, or just the ‘Father’ part?

The Jewish god of the old testament and the Christian god of the new testament is ‘Jehovah’ (YHWH-JHVH), not Jesus; and the superstition that eventually to the blotting out of that name (and ultimately in the issue this thread seems to be discussing) was brought about by the Jews.

Since they were not considered to be the same person until the doctrine was bred into the church from pagan sources centuries later (it was not an early Christian or Jewish belief), the Jewish superstition never applied to Jesus name; especially since they don’t believe he is the Christ; and was never carried on by the Christians. That being the case the name Jesus was never censored, but YHWH was; to be replaced in most bibles (save 4 places) with an uppercase LORD or GOD, with a note in the bibles explaining why [get a hold of an old King James version or the like as well as a new one and you can see]. That developed more and more, until those last 4 occurrences were removed, along with the footnote explaining why; then apparently to situations like this (G_d is a new one to me O.o ).

Had the trinitarian doctrine been an actual Jewish and 1st-century Christian belief instead of indoctrinated later, perhaps it would have been different. Simply put, the early Christians didn’t believe Jesus was god and the Jewish religious leaders didn’t care; only later Christians did; and the name YHWH never has applied to a trinity. It’s actually a good point that you’ve brought out.