Maybe our brains are function boxes.

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In math, there are these things that I did in 1st grade called function boxes. Whatever you put in, a number would come out, based on a rule or something. Maybe the rule was x2, so you put 10 in and get 20.

I have a theory that our brains might work like this. Our senses work with our brain to put stuff in there, and what we say, do, and act is what comes out. We start as a blank canvas at birth, but as we start to see,hear,taste,touch, and smell things, those things go into our brain and come out with our actions.

The only question is, might there be a rule like I talked about in the first paragraph? What might the rule be?

Also, do you think this is how our brains actually work?

 
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So you’re basically saying you think we respond to outside stimuli?

Yeah, we do, now go read a high school Biology textbook.

 
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In Psychology behaviourists would pretty much say the same thing.
Of course, the blank canvas line doesn’t apply. There are some innate behaviours. Not everything is learned.

 
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In the end every object can be considered a function box like that. You just have to add that the input includes the initial condition and it will work for everything.

 
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yes, this is very basically how our mind works. but there’s not a single rule for the whole thing that can be expressed like “×2”.

 
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We are, without doubt, influenced by external stimuli, but there are some things we are born with, like EPR mentioned.

 
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Originally posted by tenco1:

So you’re basically saying you think we respond to outside stimuli?

Yeah, we do, now go read a high school Biology textbook.

You’re right, I should.

 
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Originally posted by EPR89:

In Psychology behaviourists would pretty much say the same thing.
Of course, the blank canvas line doesn’t apply. There are some innate behaviours. Not everything is learned.

I’d like to know how we got these.

 
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Originally posted by GentleGyroGinger:
Originally posted by EPR89:

In Psychology behaviourists would pretty much say the same thing.
Of course, the blank canvas line doesn’t apply. There are some innate behaviours. Not everything is learned.

I’d like to know how we got these.

Which?

 
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Originally posted by GentleGyroGinger:
Originally posted by EPR89:

In Psychology behaviourists would pretty much say the same thing.
Of course, the blank canvas line doesn’t apply. There are some innate behaviours. Not everything is learned.

I’d like to know how we got these.

Hi.
Did a dumb thing, got what I deserved. So yeah, this is me again.

Innate behaviours are products of our evolution. At some point organisms we would evolve from developed certain mechanics, behaviours etc. that were beneficial for their survival and allowed them to adapt to their environment better. They were not learned but structural changes in their genome. They proved to be beneficial or they simply haven’t vanish from the human genome yet and so we still have them.
Of course, another possibility is a new mutation. In that case the innate behaviour does not hail from the specie’s history but is a new development. Can’t think of a example of the top of my head, but it’s certainly possible.

 
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What dumb thing did thout do? :)

Originally posted by EPeeR:
Of course, another possibility is a new mutation. In that case the innate behaviour does not hail from the specie’s history but is a new development. Can’t think of a example of the top of my head, but it’s certainly possible.

A good example would be a spinal reflex action with clonus.

Clonus isn’t present in most of the population, and when it does occur, it is due to the presence of a neurological disorder, almost always genetic in nature. Instead of a typical knee-jerk response to stimulus, the reflex oscilates, the movement each cycle becoming less and less until it finally ceases.

 
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“function machine” is WAY too simplistic a term.

“turing machine” is better. Much, much better. still falls short of the real deal, but only on some of the fine points, like efficiency and some quantum behavior.