Transcending History

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This year I started taking AP European History at my high-school. I had always enjoyed history to an extent, but this was something different. Although the teacher is horrible and the tests are poorly written, I’ve found that I treasure the history greatly, and the situations which come along with it. I am trying (sometimes consciously, sometimes unconsciously) to apply past history to avoid the dire mistakes of the past. I find myself trying to join the right group that will not be ridiculed as dumb, intolerant, or against the right cause by historians in the future. This has led me to stop saying the pledge of allegiance daily at my school (I stand in honor of it, but do not put my hand over my heart or chant the swearing of my life to the country), to criticize current economical and political systems, and to eliminate any traces of irrational nationalism in my life.

Tell me, does anyone else have this “need” to attempt to transcend history and be seen as one of the only “sane” ones in the retrospect of historians? Or are historians themselves so biased that I am not guaranteed any honor in the future? Does anyone else consider what something will be seen on in the page of a history book in 500 years whenever they hear about current events, or am I just so introverted that extremely strange thoughts like this only occur in me?

 
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My Western Civilizations teacher made this awesome point last week. He is sure that historians 500 years from now will look at the past half-century and see that the U.S. presidency had become an “old boy’s club”. With the torch going from Bush to Clinton to Bush with a Clinton in government the whole time… it seems like a few names are always there. Another perfect example is Kennedy. While they may be dropping like flies, they still have a foot-hold in the U.S.

I totally see where you’re coming from. Its actually a bit saddening that we were under the presidency of a man who has been voted the 39th (?) worst president ever.

 
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Actually, you are not the only one that hears about those thoughts. Sometimes I wonder if maybe I could be one lifted up in such a desperate time in a few hundred years. Now, I surely do not agree with you not pledging allegiance to America, but I can understand your motives.

You want your actions to have a lasting impact, and to stand apart from all the others that are going down the wrong path in this moment in history, correct?

 
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Originally posted by Pink_Fuzzy_Bunny:

Actually, you are not the only one that hears about those thoughts. Sometimes I wonder if maybe I could be one lifted up in such a desperate time in a few hundred years. Now, I surely do not agree with you not pledging allegiance to America, but I can understand your motives.

You want your actions to have a lasting impact, and to stand apart from all the others that are going down the wrong path in this moment in history, correct?

You are correct. Don’t take me as unpatriotic when you read that, by the way, it’s just a personal preference of mine to not swear my life to any country, especially one whose inner workings are not disclosed to me.

 
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Tell me, does anyone else have this “need” to attempt to transcend history and be seen as one of the only “sane” ones in the retrospect of historians?

If you mean to simply exercise critical thinking and to not approach the world with a heavy level of hypocrisy, then yes.

Or are historians themselves so biased that I am not guaranteed any honor in the future?

As you have implied, the majority of people are along for the ride, and this includes historians. How many times do we hear things in the general lexicon and in the history books that are patently untrue? Quite often.However, there is always at least one who will take notice.

Does anyone else consider what something will be seen on in the page of a history book in 500 years whenever they hear about current events, or am I just so introverted that extremely strange thoughts like this only occur in me?

I know quite a few people who think this way. I try not to think to far ahead, but it helps to put things in perspective sometimes. It also allows one to escape the passion of the moment, where all mistakes originate from.

 
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You are correct. Don’t take me as unpatriotic when you read that, by the way, it’s just a personal preference of mine to not swear my life to any country, especially one whose inner workings are not disclosed to me.

Screw patriotism tbh :P Yada Yada I support my country, it’s the best! the fact I’ve never been to another country and actually made a judgment on which is better is irrelevant!" … Pssht.

I mean, I like my country sure, and I’ll always see it as home. But I don’t claim it’s the best country without traveling around the world first.

Nothing wrong with wanting to leave your mark of history on the world and making sure it was a good one and not part of the bad stuff now :)

 
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I don’t say the pledge for the exact same reason. A wise reading of history will steer you to distrust excessive nationalism.

 
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I must make this history joke. July 4th doesnt appear on the England calender!!

 
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Or are historians themselves so biased that I am not guaranteed any honor in the future?

As they say: “Nothing bad about the dead”
people will generally consider your more positive sides later on in history.