@Designers

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Hey everyone

I’m currently a student at Shepherd University in West Virginia, and for my final project in my communication and new media class I’m writing a report on a career field I have an interest in. If you haven’t guessed since I’m posting in this forum, it’s a career in game design. One of the requirements of this is that I get an interview with someone who works as a designer, big or small time, and ask them questions relating to the career field and how technology and media have affected it.

If anyone would be willing to help me out, the interview can be done by email, and I won’t have many questions. The only other thing I will need is a picture and a short 150ish word bio about yourself/work as a designer.

If you’re interested you can email me at tjorda04@rams.shepherd.edu

Thanks for reading this and if you’re unable/don’t want to help then if you could bump this post I’d greatly appreciate it!

 
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One of the requirements of this is that I get an interview with someone who works as a designer, big or small time, and ask them questions relating to the career field and how technology and media have affected it.

One word. “Massively.”

I actually am leaning towards never producing another computer game and instead going back to the realm of board games. Easier to prototype, easier to change rules on the fly, easier to introduce new content as scope expands.

Harder to distribute, but I’ve been in it for the design aspect, not the money. If you have a successful concept, you can sell it, no matter its medium.

Per getting paid:
Expect to do a lot of really boring shit. You will be making quiz “games” and speaker-lead Jeopardy-like games (that is: all your program does is display a question and track the scores). And it doesn’t matter how many of them you make, you’ll inevitably end up being unable to reuse any code (or very little) because each client will want something different.

One client will want a timer with points reducing as the timer runs out.
Another client wants the timer, no score.
A third doesn’t want a timer at all and wants the user to keep picking answers when they get a wrong one.
The fourth will want to track which user answered which question how, and save it to a database.
The next will want it to be a giant glowing pyramid where the blocks represent questions and change color based on right or wrong answer.
Another client will decide to use pictures.
Yet another will want to use the same quiz and distribute new questions every week.
And then want to do pictures in week five, which was never scoped.
And a drag-and-drop word scramble in week seven.
And the client you’ve just gotten a project from in the middle of updating for week eight wants to have each question read aloud with a video component.
Oh, and branching logic. Right and wrong answers play a different clip down a conversation tree. On the iPad. Without an internet connection.

(You think I made all of those up, didn’t you? Nope, I’ve had to do every single one in one form or another.)