Recent posts by headacher on Kongregate

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Topic: Realm of the Mad God / THREAD FOR RICH PPL TO DONATE TO THE POOR_______)(*&?%$#@!@#$%?&*() _

I donate by dropping a rare item on the ground, waiting until someone comes to examine it and then pick it up. Repeat until either the guy gives up, eventually gets it from you, or the novelty of trolling him disappears. Most ways, he’ll get whatever you were giving him and you’ll get the satisfaction of making it transaction twice as difficult as it needed to be.

 
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Topic: Realm of the Mad God / [Guide] What to do, and what not to do.

Originally posted by iblob:

You would not belive how many dont know this but if you run from your enemies while shooting you can greatly increase your range.

It doesn’t technically increase your range, it just looks like it’s going farther because you’ve put more distance between the origin of your shot and yourself since you’ve fired the bullet. Likewise, if you travel towards the bullet, it looks shorter. I don’t know if you can actually use this to your advantage.

 
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Topic: Off-topic / Headaches (Liveraches)

Change your name to “headacher”.

 
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Topic: Kongregate / I'm going to try to write an article about games- Atmosphere vs Gameplay

Made a new one about storylines! Posted one copy of it in General Gaming and the other in the game design section, like suggested. View it here

 
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Topic: General Gaming / Story Lines, Excuse Plots, And You, an Article about Games

Oh hai there. I won’t waste time on introductions here, but if you want to know who I am and what I’m going to speak about in this article, you can read the first few paragraphs of my first article about Atmosphere vs. Gameplay . There might be one more article after this, and if that does well I might try to do another. Basically, these articles are meant for people who like to make, want to make, or want to analyze games as a form of media( medium). You might find some things of use in here, but as this is an article you may be frightened by the large wall of text about to flatten you. Before you start, you might want to familiarize yourself with the following games:
Nanobeast,
RPG Shooter:Starwish,
and Pixel Purge.
Keep in mind that me referencing games doesn’t mean they’re good or bad, just that they’re nice examples.
Here’s a warning for you: if you’re not interested in the topic, or examining games, or even playing them more critically, leave now, because the whole point of this is you get something out of the article, and maybe start examining games more critically. Anyway, let’s get right into my topic:


Story lines, excuse plots, and you


It’s difficult to generalize all flash games, but we can agree that some have some pretty crummy plots. See, a plot can do one of three things to your game: It can either enhance the game as a whole (Starwish), not effect gameplay in the slightest (Pixel Purge) or detract from and interrupt the gameplay, but likely not by much (Nanobeast). A good plot is a plot that blends in with the gameplay, like a fruit would blend in deliciously with yogurt for a delicious fruit smoothie. A bad plot is when you throw a brick in that smoothie and the whole thing comes crashing apart. Now as you may already know, I reference a lot of Kongregate games, because, well, it’s easier to learn about these things with example. We’re going to look at three examples: story line that detracts from and interrupts the game, story line that enhances the game, and storyline that doesn’t affect the game at all. If you want to get a better idea of what I’m about to talk about you should play about five minutes of Pixel Purge, RPG Shooter:Starwish (well, maybe more than five minutes of that), and Nanobeast.

Storyline that detracts from game


No matter how bad your plot is, it will almost never significantly detract from your gameplay. The worst you can expect is a bit of derailment, a loss of atmosphere, and you’re audience just sighing and saying “oh look, another excuse plot.” Nanobeast is a good example of this: if you can get through the first two levels, which can be frustrating, you’ll realize what I’m talking about. The story adds absolutely nothing to the gameplay. It didn’t motivate me to want to play more. Yeah, it was silly, and wasn’t even trying to be good, BUT THAT’S EXACTLY MY POINT. Do NOT put a plot in your game which does NOT match your game’s design. Just leave it out. No plot is better than a plot which detracts from the game.


Storyline that does not affect game at all


You don’t even need to play Pixel Purge to get the whole story unloaded into you in ten seconds. This is different because it doesn’t interrupt gameplay, but it also doesn’t do anything for the game. The entire plot could easily be sumarized with “OH NO TEH BAD GUIZE YEWZ YER ZAPPY GUN TO ZAP THEM!” The game itself was quite fun, but the storyline was completely unnecessary, and, in my opinion, a waste of the developers time. If you look over your plot and realize you can’t incorporate the enemies in your game to blend with the plot, and if the plot will never show up again, just don’t bother. I’m not saying not to even attempt to put a plot in, but really, you’d be better off having no story at all. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying story is bad- quite the opposite, in fact. Story is an extremely huge part of the game, it’s makes up the soul of the experience! But if the story is going to detract from the game and not be compelling in the slightest? Use your time more productively. I don’t CARE about the land of Pixela RT, and I don’t see many other people caring either. Here’s a rule of thumb: if your game falls into this category, or the previous category, just don’t put it in your game. You’re better off without it.


Storyline that enhances the game as a whole


At first I used the Book of Living Magic as an example that enhances gameplay, but upon reflection it’s not so much the story as it is the setting, which will be good for a future topic, but for now I think you should take a gander at RPG Shooter: Starwish, which is probably a better example. I’ll explain why: the gameplay of RPG Shooter:Starwish (I’ll just call it Starwish for now) is bland, boring, and uninspired to say the least. It wasn’t very captivating, and once they started reusing the bosses, it just got painful. But because the story were so great, and the characters were so developed , I, personally, was motivated to play more, and the game became better because of it. I like to think Starwish is a story driven game, and I wouldn’t play past the first world if not for its story. The characters were never one dimensional, the plot was original, and overall it saves the game from being bad and rockets it into the great territory.
Now that we’ve gone over that I’m going to talk more about what you’d want to put (or leave out) a story in a flash game.
You want a story if:
1. The gameplay will work with it. You can’t have someone talking to a pirate in the cutscene and the gameplay involves you running around salshing pumpkins. They need to work together, otherwise cut it out.
2. The story is compelling. FOR GOD’S SAKE, WE DON’T NEED A SAVE THE PRINCESS PLOT! Cyclomaniacs 2 had one of those. It was lazy, and only served as a purpoe so we could gather 4 MacGuffins and save the princess. You are not being clever by parodying the princess thing when there are already parodying parodies of it.
3. Your characters have depth. See Space Shooter:Starwish or Mardek for this. It’s not as important as the other two, but if you’re going to have characters make sure you can develop them well, even if its through a journal or something like that.
4. You can tell the story through gameplay and vice versa.
5. The story fits the game. This is an extremely important one. You simply can’t have a game where the gameplay is you jumping around in a mario-esque world and the story is about a cop who doesn’t play by the rules… then again, having a cop who doesn’t play by the rules stuck in marioland does seem pretty cool… But I degress, don’t put a serious story in a game which is otherwise happy go lucky, unless you’re building around that idea.


You do not want a story if:
1. You’re already finished your game and want to add the story for the sake of having a story
2. If your story can be considered an “excuse plot”.
3. If most of the “do” rules above don’t apply to what you have so far
4. If the story won’t make people want to play more of your game
I want to cover a bit more in this article, like maybe interrupting gameplay with cutscenes versus intergrating the story into the gameplay and discussing the pros and cons but I’ve written quite a bit and can’t cover anything. Also, you get an imaginary cookie for making it to the end of this. If you have anything to add, any examples which might help people out, or just want to agree or disagree with my points comment away! Comments let me know people read these things and I appreciate them.
Tl;dr: If your story sucks, leave it out, make sure your gameplay isn’t completely unrelated to the story.

 
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Topic: Game Design / Story Lines, Excuse Plots, And You

Oh hai there. I won’t waste time on introductions here, but if you want to know who I am and what I’m going to speak about in this article, you can read the first few paragraphs of my first article about Atmosphere vs. Gameplay . There might be one more article after this, and if that does well I might try to do another. Basically, these articles are meant for people who like to make, want to make, or want to analyze games as a form of media( medium). You might find some things of use in here, but as this is an article you may be frightened by the large wall of text about to flatten you. Before you start, you might want to familiarize yourself with the following games:
Nanobeast,
RPG Shooter:Starwish,
and Pixel Purge.
Keep in mind that me referencing games doesn’t mean they’re good or bad, just that they’re nice examples.
Here’s a warning for you: if you’re not interested in the topic, or examining games, or even playing them more critically, leave now, because the whole point of this is you get something out of the article, and maybe start examining games more critically. Anyway, let’s get right into my topic:

Story lines, excuse plots, and you

It’s difficult to generalize all flash games, but we can agree that some have some pretty crummy plots. See, a plot can do one of three things to your game: It can either enhance the game as a whole (Starwish), not effect gameplay in the slightest (Pixel Purge) or detract from and interrupt the gameplay, but likely not by much (Nanobeast). A good plot is a plot that blends in with the gameplay, like a fruit would blend in deliciously with yogurt for a delicious fruit smoothie. A bad plot is when you throw a brick in that smoothie and the whole thing comes crashing apart. Now as you may already know, I reference a lot of Kongregate games, because, well, it’s easier to learn about these things with example. We’re going to look at three examples: story line that detracts from and interrupts the game, story line that enhances the game, and storyline that doesn’t affect the game at all. If you want to get a better idea of what I’m about to talk about you should play about five minutes of Pixel Purge, RPG Shooter:Starwish (well, maybe more than five minutes of that), and Nanobeast.

Storyline that detracts from game


No matter how bad your plot is, it will almost never significantly detract from your gameplay. The worst you can expect is a bit of derailment, a loss of atmosphere, and you’re audience just sighing and saying “oh look, another excuse plot.” Nanobeast is a good example of this: if you can get through the first two levels, which can be frustrating, you’ll realize what I’m talking about. The story adds absolutely nothing to the gameplay. It didn’t motivate me to want to play more. Yeah, it was silly, and wasn’t even trying to be good, BUT THAT’S EXACTLY MY POINT. Do NOT put a plot in your game which does NOT match your game’s design. Just leave it out. No plot is better than a plot which detracts from the game.

Storyline that does not affect game at all

You don’t even need to play Pixel Purge to get the whole story unloaded into you in ten seconds. This is different because it doesn’t interrupt gameplay, but it also doesn’t do anything for the game. The entire plot could easily be sumarized with “OH NO TEH BAD GUIZE YEWZ YER ZAPPY GUN TO ZAP THEM!” The game itself was quite fun, but the storyline was completely unnecessary, and, in my opinion, a waste of the developers time. If you look over your plot and realize you can’t incorporate the enemies in your game to blend with the plot, and if the plot will never show up again, just don’t bother. I’m not saying not to even attempt to put a plot in, but really, you’d be better off having no story at all. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying story is bad- quite the opposite, in fact. Story is an extremely huge part of the game, it’s makes up the soul of the experience! But if the story is going to detract from the game and not be compelling in the slightest? Use your time more productively. I don’t CARE about the land of Pixela RT, and I don’t see many other people caring either. Here’s a rule of thumb: if your game falls into this category, or the previous category, just don’t put it in your game. You’re better off without it.

Storyline that enhances the game as a whole

At first I used the Book of Living Magic as an example that enhances gameplay, but upon reflection it’s not so much the story as it is the setting, which will be good for a future topic, but for now I think you should take a gander at RPG Shooter: Starwish, which is probably a better example. I’ll explain why: the gameplay of RPG Shooter:Starwish (I’ll just call it Starwish for now) is bland, boring, and uninspired to say the least. It wasn’t very captivating, and once they started reusing the bosses, it just got painful. But because the story were so great, and the characters were so developed , I, personally, was motivated to play more, and the game became better because of it. I like to think Starwish is a story driven game, and I wouldn’t play past the first world if not for its story. The characters were never one dimensional, the plot was original, and overall it saves the game from being bad and rockets it into the great territory.
Now that we’ve gone over that I’m going to talk more about what you’d want to put (or leave out) a story in a flash game.
You want a story if:
1. The gameplay will work with it. You can’t have someone talking to a pirate in the cutscene and the gameplay involves you running around salshing pumpkins. They need to work together, otherwise cut it out.
2. The story is compelling. FOR GOD’S SAKE, WE DON’T NEED A SAVE THE PRINCESS PLOT! Cyclomaniacs 2 had one of those. It was lazy, and only served as a purpoe so we could gather 4 MacGuffins and save the princess. You are not being clever by parodying the princess thing when there are already parodying parodies of it.
3. Your characters have depth. See Space Shooter:Starwish or Mardek for this. It’s not as important as the other two, but if you’re going to have characters make sure you can develop them well, even if its through a journal or something like that.
4. You can tell the story through gameplay and vice versa.
5. The story fits the game. This is an extremely important one. You simply can’t have a game where the gameplay is you jumping around in a mario-esque world and the story is about a cop who doesn’t play by the rules… then again, having a cop who doesn’t play by the rules stuck in marioland does seem pretty cool… But I degress, don’t put a serious story in a game which is otherwise happy go lucky, unless you’re building around that idea.

You do not want a story if:
1. You’re already finished your game and want to add the story for the sake of having a story
2. If your story can be considered an “excuse plot”.
3. If most of the “do” rules above don’t apply to what you have so far
4. If the story won’t make people want to play more of your game
I want to cover a bit more in this article, like maybe interrupting gameplay with cutscenes versus intergrating the story into the gameplay and discussing the pros and cons but I’ve written quite a bit and can’t cover anything. Also, you get an imaginary cookie for making it to the end of this. If you have anything to add, any examples which might help people out, or just want to agree or disagree with my points comment away! Comments let me know people read these things and I appreciate them.
Tl;dr: If your story sucks, leave it out, make sure your gameplay isn’t completely unrelated to the story

 
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Topic: Kongregate / I'm going to try to write an article about games- Atmosphere vs Gameplay

@hiperson134 Good idea, I’ll think about it if I do another
@googoolyeye The atmosphere is the only thing it has going for it in my opinion
@BobTheCoolGuy By Doodle series do you mean “Doodle God” and its sequels?
@Thok That’s also a good idea, it would give its message much faster
@Hunkadunkus “If the gameplay is the body then music is its soul”

 
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Topic: Kongregate / I'm going to try to write an article about games- Atmosphere vs Gameplay

@ Thok By conflict I really just meant doing anything to spice up the tedious gameplay (like the log example), but I was tired when I wrote that paragraph and the one below it, so that’s understandable. I thought all the closure levels were designed well so that I never got frustrated: whenever I died it never bothered me because it was clearly my fault or because this time I know what to do.

@ Danaroth I didn’t list closure because I thought it was creepy, I listed it because it was a good example of atmosphere. Although, I still get a feeling of creepyness from it, so I guess it’s just an opinion sort of thing. Limbo is creepy, but it’s also lonely too, like mentioned.

 
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Topic: Kongregate / I'm going to try to write an article about games- Atmosphere vs Gameplay

Yeah, I’ll probably post there from now on and bump this thread for every new one I make so I can get an archive going. I don’t know if I’ll do another one though.

 
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Topic: Kongregate / I'm going to try to write an article about games- Atmosphere vs Gameplay

Thanks for the support so far guys!

@Danaroth Agreed, and he does have some nice artwork
@snipahar Thanks! If I do any others I’ll post them in there
@WiiPlayer113 Music is key, I think I’ll talk about that more in the future
@CowFriend It’s a shame it got a higher rating then closure.

 
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Topic: Kongregate / I'm going to try to write an article about games- Atmosphere vs Gameplay

Oh, hai there. I’ve been on Kongregate for 3 years-ish, and I don’t have many forum posts because I never felt the need to go on the forums. Anyways, I’m going to talk about games here. I might do more than one of these articles. Think of this like Extra Credits but with flash games.

Hopefully this article might help improve some flash games. If you’re an aspiring developer you may want to read it. If you’re looking to find out what makes a great flash game great, this might interest you. That being said, this might not be your cup of tea, so yeah. This may peak some interest, or may be lost under the forums. But I do like writing about topics I care about, and don’t really want to open a website for these types of things quite yet. I chose to write this on Kongregate because it has a community of people who play a lot of flash games.

The two main games I’m going to be talking about for example is Closure and Grey so if you haven’t already, play the games if you want to get a feeling of what I’m talking about.
You might also want to check out Elephant Quest as well. This might be tl;dr, so don’t even try to read this if you’re not interested in the topic.

Well, enough introductions, let me get started on the topic I chose. Ahem.

Atmosphere Vs Gameplay

And why you don’t need to sacrifice one for the other

Atmosphere. That word is daunting, even for designers who make professional games, games which you buy in stores or on steam. Atmosphere is not an easy thing to create, but it’s present in every game, whether that atmosphere was intended or not. You’ll realize that atmosphere is a big part of any game. The two games I chose to compare have similar atmospheres, aesthetics, mechanics and graphics, and yet are different games entirely. The games I’m talking about are Grey and Closure, but we’ll get more into that later.

Let’s look at some other games for a second (you’ll notice I’ll be referencing a lot of kongregate games in these articles for examples). Compare Elephant Quest to Closure. You can see the atmosphere of both of those games are dramatically different. But why? Why are they so different? You know, besides the fact that one’s a game about a person lost in a strange alien world of insanity, and one’s a game about an elephant that shoots lasers to find a hat.

I’m going to break down all the things that make up atmosphere:

Aesthetics- The most important thing about atmosphere is the aesthetics. For those of you who don’t know what aesthetics are, aesthetics is how the game blends together. It’s the coloring of the game, the pattern of the graphics. It’s difficult to explain, so here’s an example: Elephant Quest had bright vibrant aesthetics. It had green and blue which popped out at your eyes, flash explosions, fun aesthetics. Now let’s look at Closure. Creepy aesthetics, black backgrounds, all the while as a sketchy person moves throughout a dead black land. That is what aesthetics is, and is the most important thing about atmosphere.

Music- Another big one, music is that ominous noise in the background, or that cheery catchy tune which helps you on your quest. Music alone can either make atmosphere or break atmosphere. Think of Elephant Quest again. Now imagine it with the music of Closure. It wouldn’t work, would it? Imagine Closure with the music of Elephant Quest! The game would cease to be scary, and the music would completely destroy the atmosphere!

Level Design- Ah yes, level design. Have a creepy message scowled on the wall? Great! Your creepyness atmosphere just got way creepier! Found the Mega Ultra Blaster? Great, you now gave an atmosphere of success to your player! Without good level design, atmosphere is easy to shatter. And “good” does not mean “complex”. A straight hallway can be ten times scarier than a huge expansive map, because you’re thinking “where is the Doom Chalice to defeat Overlord Deathman” instead of “Overlord Deathman is at the end of this hallway with a giant Doomsword, and the doors just closed behind me. I’m dead.”

Obviously there are other things besides that, but I’ll cut myself short for now.

Now Gameplay. That’s another article by itself, so I’ll cut to the chase: you don’t need to sacrifice atmosphere for gameplay. Do you know why? Wait for it…

BECAUSE GAMEPLAY ADDS TO ATMOSPHERE!


(And atmosphere adds to gameplay)

Shocking, right? If you sacrifice gameplay for atmosphere, you’re losing gameplay too! Gameplay is key point of atmosphere. Haven’t you ever been playing a game and think to your self “man, this game is creepy, but IT’S SO FREAKING BORING” and then felt like quitting the game? Same thing here. Now I’m going to illustrate that with my two main games here:

Closure vs Grey.

(This part of the review contains TEH SPOILERZ!)

Grey and Closure both have black and white backgrounds that are separated with opposite shades. But I’m going to explain to you why I thought Closure was much better.

Grey was a dull, boring piece of work that involved monotonous collecting of objects to convey symbolism of giving color back to a dull world from beyond the grave. It was a good idea, but eventually the lack of gameplay was almost torturous. I usually love art games, but only when the gameplay and story work together. In this case, the story punched gameplay in the face and threw it off a cliff. The character moved slow, the level design was terrible, there were no choice or conflicts… and the worst part is it would’ve been easy to make it interesting. Don’t want your character to die, because that would ruin the atmosphere seeing as he’s a ghost? Then have a log fall over, blocking your path. Have a rope, making you climb up and around obstacles. And don’t try to tell me that obstacles would ruin the atmosphere in grey,because it wouldn’t. In fact, it would make it a much better game. Labeling yourself as art does not give you the right to have bad gameplay. That being said, it’s not a terrible game, but I wouldn’t call it above average either.

Now for Closure. Closure’s art looks less lazy then Grey’s, but that’s not what we’re here to talk about. The atmosphere of Closure is creepier, but Grey supposed to be creepy, it’s supposed to be moving. But Closure can be interpreted just as many ways as Grey! You could say it’s more artsy because the gameplay actually works with the game. Closure isn’t perfect, but it’s a very well built game.

Both games provide a unique experience, but Grey was disappointing because it couldn’t follow through on the gameplay aspect.

That was my article on Atmosphere vs Gameplay. I might consider writing other things examining flash like this. I could make it a regular thing, but I do a lot of other writing too and this article took a lot of energy. Anyway, hope you got something out of this.

Later subjects I could cover could be a serious game review, Aesthetics vs Graphics, and Skill Flash Games vs Time Flash Games. Also, I’d make up an actual name a series for these things. If not, I hope you get something out of this article.

Oh, also I feel compelled to do this:

Tl;dr: Building atmosphere is hard, but good gameplay will enhance it.

 
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Topic: Kongregate / Forum FAQs | Custom Search Engines | Useful Links

So I downloaded firebug for firefox 5, but I don’t see the icon in the bottom right. I’ve downloaded it three times and it’s in my addons but I don’t know how to open it. Help?

 
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Topic: Kongregate / Tips to get the top rated comment

Oh, hi there! If you’re reading this message, and I think you are, then you are going to learn how to get the top rated comment on one of kongregate’s games, thus boosting your ego!

1) Point out obvious dissimilarities between the flash game and real life! For example, if the military is shooting at you instead of zombies, mention this for instant ego boost!

2) Use a lot of descriptive words!

3) Swear!

4) Capitalize words FOR EMPHASIS!

5) Say the same thing everything else is saying!

6) Complain about minor things, like not having a mute button, then giving 1/5 for it.

7) Add an XD, or something.

Now that you have followed my advice, logically, the perfect comment must look like this:

" Like Pulover37 said, the lack of ability to crouch in this game, is SO DAMN ANNOYING that I had no choice but to give this game a 1/5. However, the stellar design and vibrant aesthetics managed to bump up the game to a 3/5. But please, next time try to make it so that the military prioritizes the GODDAMN ZOMBIES over ME, XD."

Have any other tips to add to this list?

 
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Topic: General Gaming / [Cursed Treasure: Don't Touch My Gems!] follow this link for a sequel to Cursed Treasure!

I wish to smack you with the back of my hand in rage.

 
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Topic: Kongregate / This actually happened

Nope, still getting -10000000 votes

 
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Topic: Kongregate / This actually happened

Alright, changed it. It still gets cut off though. Also, I still want to post comments but they all get -1000000 right away

 
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Topic: Kongregate / This actually happened

Go here for the image:
http://img207.imageshack.us/img207/7396/screenshotnf0.png

I posted it on the tech support forums, but nobody responded. Any of you had this problem?

 
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Topic: Technical Support / Immediate Rating Threshold

My comments immediatly get under the rating threshold as soon as I post them, and the bar to vote on them dissappear. What’s up with that?

 
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Topic: MARDEK RPG: Chapter 3 / To get the impossible badge...

Thanks, I realized I could just give all my weaker allies 10 fires, lightnings, earths and water liquids, and give them a hat that curses them and gives them a M.Shield and Shield

 
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Topic: MARDEK RPG: Chapter 3 / best team?

I guess it’s jus a matter of opinion, but I like Mardek-Solaar (Full party heal, almost insta-kills undeads)- Legion (‘nuff said)- and Zach/ Ss’lnceck (I swich them depending on where I am)

 
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Topic: MARDEK RPG: Chapter 3 / To get the impossible badge...

I just have a question. In Mardek’s Cambria Arena, to get the solo arena checked does that mean beating the arena with EVERY charector? I would easily be able to get it if I didn’t have to do it with everybody, because I wasn’t leveling everybody up.

 
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Topic: Game Programming / Deleting games on kongregate?

I uploaded some games, but the main system I used broke down and it doesn’t work anymore. Is there a way to delete the games because they don’t work anymore?

 
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Topic: Kongregate Multiplayer Games / [Kongai] TEH STUPID RNG IS FUDGING BROKEN

Me too. I think the reason he missed four times in a row is because he hate too much fudge and decreased his hit rate.

 
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Topic: Elements / My mono-gravity deck needs serious help

I have a lot of money, but I can’t upgrade yet because my score is always under 500. Is there anyway to make my deck better without including any other element, and keeping my graviton fire eaters? If removing them is a necessity I will,but I’d rather not. I also want to keep the oty’s because they can devour, and they are my favorites. Here it is, and I doubt it’s not very good:

Quantum Pillars (for my fire-eaters) X2
Hammer X1
Gravity Pillars X16
Gravity Shield X1
Sapphire Chargers X2
Armagio X2
Graviton Mercenaries X3
Colossal Dragons X3
Momentum X2
Otyurgh(sp?) X3
Gravity Pull X2
Graviton Fire Eater X2
Black Hole X2 (comes in handy vs a rainbow deck)

Thanks!

 
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Topic: Elements / Biggest BULLCRAP! moments.

I was fighting PVP, I had the guy at 1 HP and had five graviton mercenaries and a colossal dragon, the guy had a dark shield. All of my attacks missed, and I was killed with poison