Recent posts by vikaTae on Kongregate

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Topic: Serious Discussion / Is eating meat moral?

Ignoring that vegetables don’t grow on trees, James does have a point.

If you don’t eat another living thing, or nutrients derived from other living things, you haven’t got a lot left to eat at all. You’re going to die of malnutrition for certain. Is that the more ‘moral’ path you’re willing to walk?

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Will ISIS be considered country

Ultimately, if they manage to secure a central area, then yes, they can annexe it as their own nation. Having the land, and being able to hold it against all challengers is the litmus test for a nation. Whether it is internationally recognised as a new nation is inconsequential at that point.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Should public skating be banned?

Would roller skates not work just as well as a board, Pete? Less hassle to store, as well.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Should public skating be banned?

you don’t even have to collapse them. Pull the other way and they work in your favour. The windpipe’ll distort and close itself when it pulls away from the throat, the cartiledge working to keep it closed in that new position. Plus that way, you can actually use the person you’re assaulting as leverage.

Takes less than a pound of pressure to drive a sharp bladed item into the base of the brain through the roof of the palette. Or to sever a certain artery on either side of the neck for that matter.

So do we ban the implements, the hands that could hold implements, or the brain that is considering using the implements?

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Should public skating be banned?

If you’re going down that route, might I point out that all limbs can be used as weapons?

Anything else used as a weapon, tends to be operated by at least one of the limbs.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Should public skating be banned?

You’d better ban feet as well. After all, sometimes other people’s feet can get in your way, or even leave scuff marks via their coverings on different surfaces.

Some people even trip over their own feet. A clear health hazard.

If we get rid of the feet, the legs serve no real purpose, so those may as well be banned too.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Should public skating be banned?

By the same ‘logic’ bicycles, wheelchairs and pushchairs should also be banned.

Same root issues as Mafefe is claiming skateboards have a risk of causing.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Is eating meat moral?

Please learn what the big words mean before you try using them.

Originally posted by GlutenFreeVegan:

Its not. You are LITERALLY paying someone to murder a poor, innocent animal because you think it tastes good.

By its very definition, if a killing was legal then it is not, and cannot be, murder.

It has been PROVEN that a vegan diet is 100% sustainable, so eating meat is not necessary to live.

Only through the addition of artifical compounds to replicate the compounds found in animal flesh. You’ll be able to survive using a purely vegan diet, but your health will steadily decline until you stop it.

Also, what kind of sociopath wants to eat another living thing? No thanks! I prefer eating healthy things like salad.

Salad is mostly vegetables (and a few fruits) which are also living things. In order to not be a hypocrite by your own standards, you would have to boycott eating any fruit or vegetable matter at all.

Also, in response to the title, morals are purely subjective anyway. So, it’s moral to do something if you believe it is moral to do something. The consequences of trying, have little if anything to do with the morality involved.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Citizen Rights to not be Filmed, Vs The freedom of movement rights of those with Visual Prosthetics

A while ago, we had a short discussion on a law being discussed in Australia, to among other things, legally limit the right to film the people going in and out of abortion clinics, as a move to stop ‘naming and shaming’ the people using them.

I don’t see any problem with this in principle. It’s not really what I wish to discuss here, but it does impact upon it.

In many first world nations, such as the US, Australia, NZ, Britain, et cetera, these buffer zones between places of deep rooted contention and the general public are becoming more common. Laws against filming near certain stores and services are likely to become more common, as more and more groups try to use cameras to ‘name and shame’ people using planned parenthood services, gun stores, and other places of deep polarisation in belief.

Yet at the same time, we are seeing a slow but steady uptake of eye augmentation prosthetics, and in one case a complete eye-bypass sight system, many or most of which have one thing in common – they use cameras to allow the person to see. Many record their images even if its only for a few deciseconds, as part of the caching process.

It would be impossible to visually tell an apparatus that is simply feeding images to the brain via a patch into the optic cord, from one that is simultaneously imply feeding images to the brain via a patch into the optic cord and dumping a second copy into video memory on a body area network storage device.

So, as the law continues to recognise the importance of responsible use of cameras in delicate situations, are we setting ourselves up long-term, for the creation of exclusion zones where people using visual prosthetics are effectively banned from entering due to the fear they may use their prosthetics to record in ways organic eyes don’t tend to, or can you see potential solutions that would allow cameras meant to restore vision into areas where cameras are usually legally disallowed?

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Liberal vs Conservative view on education.

Originally posted by James146:

I get your opinion on how to improve education, but I am more interested in what each party wants to do to improve education.

Not a lot.

Several right-wing elements are interested in abandoning the public school model in favor of homeschooling, usually with religious undertones as a way of returning to the country’s roots and bringing back a strong Christian nation.

Several left-wing elements are pushing for increased access to universal education, teaching in ways that can be impartially measured.

The rest is a muddle of everything else between those two extremes, with no real consensus on how to proceed.

The only real consensus you’ll find is that neither of the two US main parties are thinking long-term. Both are angling for ‘quick fixes’ that can be used to show an immediate improvement even if its only a blip on the radar – so long as it occurs before the next election.

In other words education is a political football, and not much else.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Something needs to be said about feminism/liberalism.

Originally posted by petesahooligan:

In places where there is less education (areas that are crippled with poverty), birth-rates can be as high as about 5.6, whereas in someplace like the United States the birth-rate is about 2.

That’s not primarilly an education issue, but a mortality rate one. The local culture accepts that most kids are going to die before they reach adulthood, so families are large to compensate for expected losses.

Educating families does little if anything to offset this. Instead it takes multiple generations where the child mortality rate is progressively lower and lower to instill the realisation they don’t have to have so many children to ensure some survive to adulthood.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Liberal vs Conservative view on education.

Originally posted by James146:

You are not conservative. However, I believe you have some knowledge on their viewpoint and you might be able to explain it. I tend to think that you know more about both sides on some issues, like this one.

Possibly because I’m not really liberal or conservative – I tend to go a different way. But thank you for the improved explanation, and eventual compliment :)


  • The first thing that will really need to be done, is a united consensus about what education should actually require. Not down to the minutae, but in broad strokes. Which subjects are required as core skills. Which subjects are ‘nice to have’ but not essential, and which areas really must be covered. Things like proper sex education, or basic citizen knowledge.

    This would then form the foundation of a national curriculum every school across the country was required to meet as a bare minimum.

  • A nation-wide analysis of educational infrastructure, and the appointing of a federal department whose job it is to look at every school across the country and identify where the buildings are not fit for purpose. Said department to have the power to demand change from a regional educational authority, including the power to condemn educational buildings and appropriate additional funds if necessary from the budgets of the regional authorities to put the situation right.

  • Renegotiation with teacher unions, towards the mandate that whilst good teachers are recognised and protected, the protections against teachers with poor teaching skills are diminished, and get progressively worse the longer the situation continues. To the point where long-term hopeless teaching staff as laid out under a set of union-agreed metrics are no-longer covered by union protection.

  • Abolishment of tenure in the teaching environment. Seriously, it does nothing but promote lazy intellectualism among the group the students rely on most for knowledge.

  • Expand freedom of choice to all schools both public and private within a parent’s catchment area but allow the school to set hard limits on the numbers they can take, to avoid school overcrowding. These numbers to be publicly published alongside the school statistics, and free to change each year.

  • ‘Teach to the test’ has its place, but not to the extent it is being done currently. We require such teaching to aid favourable statistics, but no more than two such tests a year should be the goal.

  • Redraw the school year, and abolish the long summer holiday. It’s there as a historical legacy for when children were needed on the farms to help bring in the harvest. The holiday is far too long, and anything taught to the chuildren before it is near-guaranteed to be forgotten by the end of it.

    Instead, increase the number of terms per year from an average of six, to an average of seven. Space them out more evenly, so the other holidays are longer, but the 1-3 month break in the summjer is drastically reduced. There’s no break in the flow of education that way.

  • Improve IT infrastructutre in schools to allow for more telelearning. It’s a given that every school is not going to be able to find subject-matter experts on every subject it might wish to teach. It is not a given that the school won’t end up with a handful of students talented in that subject.

    Use telelearning / video conferencing to allow classes for these niche subjects to be built up from many schools, all using the services of a teacher from another. Simplify pay structure reqwuirements in this area so each school knows how much it will have to pay per student per class in this manner.

    Award credit for the resulting student’s exam results in such subjects to BOTH the school with the student and the one providing the teacher, to encourage future cooperation.

  • Focus on decreasing class sizes where possible, focussing heavily on grouping those students with similar ability levels together.

  • A school typically has a lot of facilities that are potentially useful to the local community. Encourage the development of a community relations position within the school to rent/lease school facilities to community groups after school hours, as both a way of building better bonds with the community, and increasing the pool of school finances to use to provide a higher educational standard during school hours.

  • Recognise that there are three main, very different vectors a student may learn best in: Highly visual, highly auditory, or hands-on. Recognise that every student will be a different mix of those three elements, and as such no one method of information delivery should be the only way to gain information, with the obvious exception of if there is a group known to all be highly proficient in a single vector.

    Where possible, classroom groups should prioritise groups of students with the same predominent information learning method where swift uptake of information is desired, and groups of students with different primary information learning methods where deeper understanding is desired.

  • The French model of education in the classroom has a lot of positives going for it. They decouple the teacher from crowd control. This is worth trying in the mainstream in more countries.

    In the French model, you have two ‘teachers’ in every classroom. One is the subject specialist, able to explain their subject at multiple levels, and expected to maintain a passion for the subject. Their job is to teach the children. The other is the discipline specialist, and is expected to keep an eye on the children, and handle any discipline issues that arise, so the other is free to teach.

    In this system, the salaries of the teaching staff are a little lower, reflecting the loss of the discipline aspect, but it means that even with disruptive students in the classroom, education for the majority is not disrupted.

I’ll stop there for now, as otherwise you’ll get information overload :)

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Liberal vs Conservative view on education.

I wasn’t aware I was conservative, James. Thank you for explaining that to me. Who knew?

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Migrants In Europe

The UN talks a lot, but is by and large completely ineffective at actually doing anything.

As for the US? They have a severe reputation problem being seen as ‘the self-appointed World’s Policemen’, and another American invasion of a Middle Eastern country would be a PR disaster all round, regardless of the justification. Besides, they can ill-afford another war right now.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Migrants In Europe

Mostly political and ideological upheval combined with unprecedented media access to the popular uprisings in other countries. A tanking economy is a factor, but not the most powerful, and mixed in with many other issues. Natural disaster is also one of them. The crops failed this year, which did not help.

Mostly it’s the will of the people to overthrow a government they have had enough of. It’s a full blown civil war, basically.

It’s also having trouble staying entirely within Syria. Neighbours that take refugees in, keep finding themselves dragged into the conflict.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Is Abortionism misandristic?

Originally posted by Ethan719:

Wrong the spouse won’t be having a baby coming out of them… The spouse wont get a huge ass belly and a weird ass looking belly button. You know what the spouse did? The spouse had an orgasm and now the wife has to incubate, give birth to, and raise the result of his orgasm :P the spouse has no right in deciding what is done with it.

Legally no, the partner that does not have the foetus growing inside them should not have any legal right to say it cannot be aborted.

But, in a relationship, the legal aspect is not the only one that’s important. If the two parties responsible for the creation of the foetus cannot agree on what is to be done with it, and are not willing to at least hear the other out and discuss the matter before acting, then there’s no hope for the relationship itself.


I do however, agree with a point Kasic made a while back. If she does not wish it to be aborted and he does, then there should be a method by which his objection can be legally recorded along with his reasons. That way should the relationship disintegrate, this factor can be taken into consideration by a judge at a later child support hearing.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Migrants In Europe

In this case, the issue is not wealth distribution, so much as it is all out war in Syria, spilling over into neighbouring countries that are already choc-full of refugees. Even Jordan’s starting to voice concerns it’ll have to turn refugees away as there are just too many of them now.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Is Abortionism misandristic?

Antibiotics don’t work against non-bacteria parasites. They don’t work against viruses and they don’t work against macro-scale organisms of any type.

Mom’s certainly lucky you weren’t her doctor; we agree on that much.

Also, Foetus != Baby. One day you will learn there is a difference.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Migrants In Europe

Just two days ago there was another massive disaster and loss of life on the Eastern illegal immigrant pathway. An abandoned truck on an Austrian motorway was found to be full of human bodies. Initially thought to be 20 dead bodies, the total death toll was 71 when they were all removed.

They’d been packed inside a small lorry, and driven across the EU’s eastern border. But without proper ventilation, everyone on board had suffocated, and the driver, obviously upon discovering this, just parked the van at the side of a main road and ran.

He’s now been caught. As have several other individuals involved in this particular smuggling operation. But, this latest incident illustrates how bad the problem has become. It illustrates how desperately a total reform on immigration is needed, and at least has gotten the EU powers talking about how this situation must be changed.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Trump. No, not cards.

The last time I checked, the city of Detroit (working with the analogy you’re a single mother living near downtown Detroit) has buses. Or is that transportation not good enough?

Issendorf, is there any parallel to the common-use local systems where the public school is the one that charters busses specifically so they can take groups of kids to different points?

Other than that, does Detroit have a subway system of any sort? That would take quite a lot of it, and many cities here at least offer ‘single use bike’ services where a person can grab a bike from a stand anywhere in the city with a swipe-card, cycle it to another stand and swipe it back in. It would be trivial for the school to have a stand fitted and to arrange for discounted-cost cards to be issued to students further out from the transportation hub.

This is actually the opposite of economic segregation – you’re making services that were previously only available for the well-off an option for poorer families. The playing field for poor children and rich children is more level.

Yup, we fully agree here.

It works even better when you have a government department looming over the schools and insisting they present their statistics in a standardised format for much easier comparison.

Helps even more with the expectation that both public and private schools are required to teach certain standardised elements. Anything similar to a national curriculum currently mandated in the US?

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Something needs to be said about feminism/liberalism.

Originally posted by 0Gamer0:
if the first job requires strength and if men have more of it. The job does require strength (as per the hypothetical scenario you presented) and men do have more strength on average (fact). And, again, I note that the same would apply to the woman if she was stronger.

Perhaps it is worthy to note that for most jobs you will have a minimum strength requirement not an absolute strength requirement. This benefits both genders equally, as it denies physically weaker women the job, and physcically weaker men the job.

They will also be required to have the right kind of strength. A bodybuilder will likely be undesirable for general purpose construction because whilst they are strong, their strength is only expressed in certain muscle configurations: The ones they have explicitly trained for. Hence why bodybuilders are particularly prone to injury if they pull the wrong muscles – spinal erectors and grip are typically under trained. Lots of lower back problems, and an under-strength grasping ability to muscle ratio do not a good builder make.

A woman can lift a man from a burning building and carry him down a ladder if she trains the right muscles. It’s about how you apply your strength to the task at hand rather than how much you have as an absolute.

but there is the stereotype that men are tough and strong and that women are gentle and frail.

Ho yes, it’s everywhere. Nowhere near as bad as it used to be, but there’s still the unspoken assumption from a lot of quarters that if you’re a woman, you’re a frail, delicate flower.

And again, when they apply for a job, does someone tell them: “Sorry, you’re a woman.”? That is illegal as far as I know.

It’s illegal to say that, but the issue is it’s still possible for that to be the reason, just it’s dressed up as something else, or no reason given.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Is Abortionism misandristic?

Originally posted by mysticvortex13:

and anyone on the committee makes the decisions and everyone else has no say in what is ethical? that is called a conspiracy.

If you say so. Personally I don’t believe you understand what a defendable decision is.

Maybe Wikipedia can do a better job of describing what it is than I am apparently doing:

Ethics (also moral philosophy) is the branch of philosophy that involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong conduct. The term ethics derives from the Ancient Greek word ἠθικός ethikos, which is derived from the word ἦθος ethos (habit, “custom”). The branch of philosophy axiology comprises the sub-branches of Ethics and aesthetics, each concerned with concepts of value.

As a branch of philosophy, ethics investigates the questions “What is the best way for people to live?” and “What actions are right or wrong in particular circumstances?” In practice, ethics seeks to resolve questions of human morality, by defining concepts such as good and evil, right and wrong, virtue and vice, justice and crime.

In other words the purpose of an ethics committee is to discuss the issue that has arised, and see if it fits into the common morality the organisation itself is oriented towards, as opposed to the individual morality of the organisation member. It’s all about justifying the reason for that morality against the organisation’s stance on other issues, against the elements that matter to the organisation, and ensuring there is a consistent stance, ideally free of hypocracy and undefendable elements.

You can of course put your case towards them, argue and defend your corner to them, but ultimately yes, they are the ones who ultimately get to decide if your work falls within acceptable ethical boundaries or not, or what changes you will be expected to make to your modus operandi in order to ensure your work complies with the ethical guidelines of the organisation.

you need something tangible. something consistent. something everyone can agree upon.

Well, not everyone’s going to agree on a given code of ethics, but if you wish to continue working with an organisation, or continue representing them to the public at large, you have to abide by the ethics committee rulings. If you don’t, and it bugs you that much, you are welcome to seek employment elsewhere.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Black Lives Matter

Originally posted by mysticvortex13:

actually, we have penning traps already. we just need to figure out how to snag neutrons and then how to push the particles back together into an atom of our design, and then after that how to automate the process.

Yes ‘all’ we need is to invent several generations of brand new technologies, some of which will be insanely energy inefficient with our current technological capabilites, and well beyond our means.

You honestly don’t see how ludicrous what you’re asking is?

All we have to do is invent a perpetual motion machine and all our energy problems will be solved! Free energy for everyone! It’s on a direct par with what you’re asking.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Trump. No, not cards.

Schools are not supposed to be for-profit institutions. They’re expected to run at a financial loss as an investment for the future. That’s most of your problem with schooling right there.

Every private school I can think of runs a property-portfolio and/or stock and bond investments to provide additional funding. The parental fees are kept low by competition, and £9,000 – £12,000 per annum isn’t much more than a public school costs per child anyway.

 
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Topic: Serious Discussion / Something needs to be said about feminism/liberalism.

I have to agree with Pete, Gamer. I can think of plenty of times when it’s been more of a struggle than it should have, to be taken seriously.

Even now, when an advancement is being pitched to help secure an additional round of funding, even in the cases when I invented the damn thing, it’s better to send a guy in to demonstrate it to the panel. If I’m there, the investors will tend to address questions to him anyway and ignore me. I know it happens with other women at the company too, so before you suggest it, it’s not a ‘something wrong with me’ issue.

The problem is I’m a female, and there is still enough bias in the establishment for that to be an additional issue. It’s not particularly fair or pleasant, but it’s definitely still there.

There is an expectation in society that men will be technical, and women more intuative, so when a technical woman is encountered, there is definitely a tendency to brush her off as I hestitate to say underling, but someone less important.