Recent posts by FinalStrife7 on Kongregate

Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

Originally posted by Pimgd:

“It’s totally nonsensical, however some programming languages like to be forgiving. Depending on the language, constraints like true, false, null, etc, actually have internal values that the compiler compares. Javascript is similar in its wacky handling of things like that. If you’re lucky, it’s internally consistent. Is null > false true? What about true > false? Null < true?”

True is 1 and False is 0.
For some programming languages,
anything but 0 is true (AS3, PHP, ColdFusion for instance).
I’m not sure, but some programming languages may have this other way around. (true = 1, false = 0, and any number other than 1 is false)

Null is something that represents “nothing”. Not 0 nothing but “nothing nothing”.
Some programming languages will see this in the literal context and say “anything is bigger than nothing”, and all operations with null are true.
Most programming languages will try to have some kind of error prevention – any operations with null result in false, save for an equality check (as null is null)
Null is (usually) internally represented as 0×0000000 (memory location). Attempting to do anything with this gives a “NullPointerException” or “NullPointerError” or something else related to null pointer, fireballs, fiery death of a running thread and an unhappy computer (this segment contained some jokes, in cases you didn’t notice, NullPointers tend to not cause explosions).

Dot notation is a way to shorten “of”. It can be a strange syntax, though, as it’s written in reverse compared to English.
person.weight = weight of person
person.legs = legs of person
person.legs.weight = weight of legs of person

Writing code has to be learned by doing it. Do yourself a favor and print out (or make use of two monitors) a sheet of paper with the common syntax for…
- variable declaration
- names of datatypes
- comparison operators
- input and/or output functions (how to get stuff on the screen)

Try to get hello world working, then use what you’ve printed or written down to alter the hello world program so that it does some kind of simple math, then something like simple math and using the result in an if statement…
A good achievable goal is a game like “Guess the number” – it has user input, screen output, if statements and else if statements (“no, higher” – “no, lower”), some sort of main control loop, and you’ll have to look something up to randomize the number to be guessed (although you could circumvent that by just setting it to a fixed value…).

As for this thread…
You said that you want to understand why something does what it does, and using a (metaphorical) calculator only tells you the answer, and not the why. I’m still gonna tell you to use that calculator, because at the end of the day it’s not our guesses of what it does that matter – it’s what the computer decides that it will be.

Gonna paste this into my Evernote. (Edit: And thank you.) I wish I could qualify the problems I’ve encountered with dot notation, becaue I know I’m not selling it right. The theory all makes sense, but somewhere after Notation 101, it just loses me. I’ll see if I can’t just brute force it at some point in the future.

Hello World’s the funnest part, and it’s fun to fiddle. I like to fancy I used to be quite the whiz with TI-Basic on my old calculator (all self-taught) but AS3’s obviously different. I think the problem might be related in large part to the complexity of AS3. It’s possible to do something a myriad of different ways so half the time spent seems (to me) to be devoted to figuring out what exactly it is I’m trying to do. Let it never be said AS doesn’t have a learning curve.

I definitely recognize the importance of the calculator result but unfortunately I’m the kind of learner who, if I don’t understand something functionally, I don’t understand it at all. I barely passed the Java class I took senior year of high school with a D thanks only to rote memorization, Lego-ing code together, but I know I didn’t actually understand a single bit of what I was doing nor why, and my projects (and grade) reflected that.

Originally posted by BobJanova:

If he’s coming from C++ he’s leading you up the garden path with regard to AS. In C and C++, the constant ‘NULL’ represents a literal 0, so true > NULL. That’s not true in object based languages with a true null, like AS – in these languages the definition of what a comparison operator should do is arbitrary.

I’ll ask him what discrepancies he knows between the two languages (to start). He codes C++ for a living so I’m not surprised he thinks within that oaradigm by default. It hadn’t occurred to me he might not be separating everything as neatly as he should (for my benefit).

Originally posted by UnknownGuardian:
Originally posted by I_love_you_lots:

This is silly!


At least it makes more logical sense than javascript.


That… is unreal. :|

Originally posted by m4rek:

Wut?

Exactly.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

I don’t understand this part. :/

What do you not understand? You raised the point of political scientists.

Right, but I don’t understand the wording of your response.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

Your link goes nowhere, but I checked the site and have bookmarked it. I saw nothing about 1-on-1, though.

Kongregate’s stupid forum breaks the link.
<a href="http://hub.tutsplus.com/sessions/as3-101--active-7395?request_uri=%2Fsessions%2Fas3-101%2F" rel="nofollow">http://hub.tutsplus.com/sessions/as3-101--active-7395?request_uri=%2Fsessions%2Fas3-101%2F</a>;

I don’t really get the problem.
Just do it.
If you say you have a problems with coding, but cannot come up with any then you don’t really have them.

I don’t agree. Just because I don’t remember something doesn’t mean it doesn’t still exist… Again, I bombed molecular biology. The fact that I repressed everything doesn’t magically mean the obstacles are gone. I already mentioned that logic was the biggest problem I faced. Looking over some code tutorials online dot notation for some reason befuddles me as well. The average online tutorial makes it seem easy but I faintly remember it all going to shit when I tried to do it and it being overwhelming. I don’t know. That’s why I’m trying to narrow my focus.

Originally posted by player_03:
Originally posted by BobJanova:

It’s just the definition that AS has chosen to use. There isn’t really a deeper reason.

/thread

Kind of. I finally caved and just “gave up” to my friend. He basically said that there isn’t really right answer per se. I told him my guess was that it shouldn’t make sense, and when he asked why, I said, “Because.” And when he asked, “Because why?” I said, “Because because.” :|

The crux of his explanation: “It’s totally nonsensical, however some programming languages like to be forgiving. Depending on the language, constraints like true, false, null, etc, actually have internal values that the compiler compares. Javascript is similar in its wacky handling of things like that. If you’re lucky, it’s internally consistent. Is null > false true? What about true > false? Null < true?”

I paraphrased what truefire said and asked him if that was possibly how “false” was returned.

“Not sure how AS3 does it, but that’s how C++ does it.”

So it seems there is a deeper reason of some sort, though I’ll be damned if I’m going to spend any more time trying to figure out what. :/ Not quite the closure I was hoping for, but what’s a guy to do?

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

In that regard, I believe my conclusion makes perfect sense.

Again: no. Because looking at code and thinking about what it does is not programming.


I agree. That wasn’t my conclusion.
Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
What if everybody came to the same but wrong conclusion?
If you have the impression everybody came to a different solution and you cannot settle on one conclusion how are you worse?

Because my interest is in the manner in which people arrived at their conclusions, I recognize that there are degrees of “rightness” and that my completely uneducated guess is apt to be much less “right” than someone who correctlly made four of the five steps of logic but flubbed the last one. They’re decidedly closer to finding the right answer than I am.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

I’ve tried writing my own code and it’s always been incredibly frustrating because there are so many places where it can go wrong.

So does life. Better suicide now, because according to Murphy: “Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong”.
Seriously? Then how did you ever approach anything in your life that you had to learn, say writing for example?
You appear to be able to do it, even though sometimes it still goes wrong I guess.

I said that writing code was incredibly frustrating—not that everything in life is incredibly frustrating. There are a number of things I personally find very east to learn and do. I fully recognize the learning potential behind making mistakes and I embrace that opportunity. How I approach things in life that are significantly more frustrating than most other things is to either (a) abandon them completely, e.g. my attempts to learn molecular biology, or (b) try to go about the problem in a different way, which is what I’m doing now with this.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

The logic I’m referring to is more or less just math, isn’t it? Conditionals? Booleans? That can be studied completely independent of programming

No. What is “null” in math? Maybe an empty set? Could you compare that to anything?
I don’t think this is defined.
But somehow, there’s a result in programming.
So the core definitions of things can be different in programming. (eg: you could add to a number and it eventually would become negative, not quite your regular definition of a number in math)
And there can be definitions of your own.

Well, when I asked the question I was being rhetorical. Null is an accepted property in math and logic, albeit not a very common one. I recognize that there’s a result in programming, the logical process of which was my original point of enquiry.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

I don’t need my friend, but help is limited, and one-on-one (kind of) personalized help is even more limited.

As you mention 1 on 1:
http://hub.tutsplus.com/sessions/as3-101—active-7395?request_uri=%2Fsessions%2Fas3-101%2F

Also: you say that this forum is full of people that know more than you about As3, yet you claim help is not available?

I think you’ll find I never once claimed help isn’t available. Per your own quote of me, I said it was limited which, in light of circumstances, is completely accurate. Your link goes nowhere, but I checked the site and have bookmarked it. I saw nothing about 1-on-1, though. And yes, there are people here who know more than me about AS3 on Kong however I’d be an idiot to think they’re just sitting around twiddling their thumbs waiting to take on a student. My friend is convenient, willing to help, and free.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

I’m not trying it out myself because I’m not even touching actual coding anymore at this point. Again, way too frustrating.

You are touching code. This thread is about code.
Could give an example of what you tried? And what’s so frustrating?

Yes, I’m touching code in the strictest sense, but I said I wasn’t touching cod_ing_, which I mean to be functions and objects and classes and the active process of making all that hanky-panky with brackets and such. I don’t have any examples of what I tried. They were just the downloadable tutorials that come after Hello World. It’s been at least a year since I tried coding anything so I don’t remember specifically what tripped me up last time, but I know logic was a not insignificant part of it.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

If a room full of political scientists can’t agree on how to solve problem A, then the chance that a random high school junior with one semester of “civics” will find a solution that’s even remotely as “right” is even less likely. I’m not seeing how that makes no sense.

Political scientists would not agree on something just for the sake of not agreeing or because they have different opinions or goals.

To me, a warning is an error. If there’s an error, the code does not compile. So for my opinion on strict code, this does not compile. But truefire pointed out, that it actually does compile.

I don’t understand this part. :/

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

I appreciate that UG took the time to calculate the expression, but I don’t have the ability to work backwards from it


Why do you want to work backwards from it?
true is not false. Which deeper meaning are you trying to find in that?
false is not smaller than “null”, which as an operation does not make too much sense at all, but it happens to be false. So that’s the way it is.


So far, programming for you is math done by politicians. In terms of madness, that’s actually about right. ;)


I meant work backwards in the sense of try to figure out why it’s false. i was assuming that it’s even possible, but since I don’t know programming I wasn’t sure if that was possible. I understand that true is not false, but it’s the less-than that’s losing me. Saying that false is not smaller than null seems to imply that it’s potentially greater than or equal to null, but that doesn’t seem to make much sense either. Like Draco18s, my initial guess was that it might be just undefined since the operation, as you put it, doesn’t make sense. That’s what I’m trying to find out in all this: if the compiler is returning ‘false’, why is this apparently nonsensical expression—“I banana twelve”—considered legal? :/

Originally posted by FlashGrenade:

Okay son why don’t you just post a link to the code you’re having trouble with so that we can see it?

That’s the only line. I mean, there’s a second one in the email he sent me, but it’s not supposed to be related.

Originally posted by BobJanova:

I’m glad to see an explanation for this snippet which isn’t decompiling, which is what it looked like … although I’m still suspicious, _loc_1 isn’t the kind of name that any actual person would name anything.

In terms of the actual snippet, I’d say he’s screwing with you a little. But it’s easy enough to follow the logic: true===false is self-evidently false, so it evaluates to false<null, and I think any arithmetic comparator with a null returns false (like it does with NaN).

I have no idea where he gets his variable names. He’s used loc_1/2 before, but he usually just does letters (int a) and such. Never thought to ask why.

Why, though, does a null automatically return a false? Is it that false is the lesser of two evils (if neither true nor false technically apply)? False seems to imply a certainty that I would think null would make impossible. If someone asks me if 2 < banana, isn’t that an impossible question to answer? To say ‘false’ would imply that it is possible to definitively answer.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

I definitely appreciate you showing me where the answers do and don’t overlap—I would have never gotten the Portal reference—but the conclusive answer I was referring to was the why of the solution. I appreciate that UG took the time to calculate the expression, but I don’t have the ability to work backwards from it, so if knowing that it equals false is supposed to reveal the method, I’m not seeing it. In this way, it only marginally does me any good. Though I certainly don’t want to discount his/her contribution, it was still just the calculator answer, which is why I said before that “trying it out” didn’t really help me. In replying to NineFiveThree, my concern was more that a group of people had all more or less taken the necessary logical steps in their heads to solve the problem, and had all arrived at differing answers. I probably should have made that more clear.

You’re right about the null “answer”. I’m not sure where I thought I saw that, but it seems I pulled it from the same place I seem to pull most everything else (i.e. my ass). :/

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:

Considering everyone here probably knows more about AS3 than I ever will, yet they’ve given answers as varied as “doesn’t compile”, “does compile”, “null”, “true”, and “false […] depending on the implementation” (EDIT: and “undefined”) I’m just going to tell him I give up. :/ On this week at least.

Your conclusion makes no sense at all.
The answers you mentioned aren’t even comparable or were stated to be guesses.

If you want to learn it, write your own code.
Why do you need your “friend” for that if you aren’t sure if he’s just fucking with you?

If you’re not sure which answer is correct, why don’t you just try it out yourself?

I think the core of the problem is that you think programming means starring at the screen until you found the problem. It’s not.

You say that the answers aren’t comparable, but you don’t say why or how I’m supposed to know they’re not. The fact that some of them were guesses further underscores my point, namely that if people who more or less can be said to “understand” AS3 can’t come to a consensus about what a line of code would or would not do, then there’s even less chance of me doing so. In that regard, I believe my conclusion makes perfect sense.

I’ve tried writing my own code and it’s always been incredibly frustrating because there are so many places where it can go wrong. My goal in approaching my friend was that I might be able to separate it into distinct areas of focus and try and get at it that way. The logic I’m referring to is more or less just math, isn’t it? Conditionals? Booleans? That can be studied completely independent of programming, and since it’s one of my weakest areas by far I figured I could raise my overall “average” level of understanding by improving my weakest score, so to speak.

I don’t need my friend, but help is limited, and one-on-one (kind of) personalized help is even more limited, and I appreciate that he’s sliced time out of his busy schedule to try and enlighten a troglodyte. As I said before, I do feel I’ve made progress so, if that’s true, he is helping.

I’m not trying it out myself because I’m not even touching actual coding anymore at this point. Again, way too frustrating. I want to focus on the more fundamental ‘why’. As I also stated before, I’m not simply emailing him back a single-word response. I’m emailing him an explanation of what the computer is actually doing when it runs the code. I’m not trying to find out what 6 × 7 equals. I’m trying to find out why it equals what it does, so telling me to (metaphorically) use a calculator defeats the entire purpose of the exercise.

I don’t think programming is staring at a screen, and I don’t think anything in any of my previous posts at all suggests I think that. I do think logic means negotiating mental obstacles and extrapolating from them to form a larger heuristic conclusion, and that occasionally staring into space and thinking about the problem throughout the course of the week is an acceptable method (and one of the few available to me) of drawing such conclusions.

All that being said, I don’t see how my conclusion—if people who know much, much more about subject X than I do are unable to offer a conclusive answer to problem X, then I statistically am even less likely to find a (correct) conclusive answer—makes no sense or has been invalidated. If a room full of political scientists can’t agree on how to solve problem A, then the chance that a random high school junior with one semester of “civics” will find a solution that’s even remotely as “right” is even less likely. I’m not seeing how that makes no sense.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

Originally posted by slugrail:

Well first of all, ask your self: when has a conditional statement, comparing true with false, ever returned a value less than null?

That doesn’t even make sense.

Considering I know next to nothing about programming, I would have no conceivable way of knowing when, if ever, “a conditional statement, comparing true with false, ever returned a value less than null”. I guarantee you that an overwhelming majority of the perfectly legal logic you could give me would make as much sense to me as the code in my original post apparently makes to you. This stuff just does not make sense to me, even often at its most basic levels, so that’s why I was asking if it made sense, and for an explanation of why or why not.

It’s blatantly obvious [to me] that the code you’ve posted does nothing and is just rubbish

Fixed.

Originally posted by NineFiveThree:

Which tutorial is that?

Perhaps tutorial was the wrong word. A friend of mine is a programmer at Spiceworks here in Austin, and though he doesn’t have much free time, I’ve persuaded him to try and help me with my deficiencies in this area, so every week or two he’ll send me—semi-random?—code filled with various kinds of logic and conditionals and basic operators and I try and piece it out and email him back explaining in layman’s terms what I think the coder is attempting to accomplish. I’m not making huge strides, but I was feeling I’d been making at least some progress up until this example. I’m not sure whether he’s just fucking with me, having a laugh to see me try and fit a square peg into a round hole, or if he’s actually testing my comprehension in the same way I might ask an ESL student to answer the question, “I banana twelve?”, knowing that true comprehension means recognizing that the question itself is inherently flawed.

Considering everyone here probably knows more about AS3 than I ever will, yet they’ve given answers as varied as “doesn’t compile”, “does compile”, “null”, “true”, and “false […] depending on the implementation” (EDIT: and “undefined”) I’m just going to tell him I give up. :/ On this week at least.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

Originally posted by slugrail:

Straight off the bat I can tell you’ve just decompiled somebody elses code. It’s called obfuscation and it’s there to brainf*uck people like yourself.

Then it appears someone is having a joke at my expense. So the right answer is that there is no right answer?

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / (True === False) ???

This may be a stupid question but since Google doesn’t parse equals signs I’m drawing blanks.

I’m fiddling with game logic and one tutorial declares a local variable

var _loc_1:*

as

= (true === false) < null;

That second part has me confused. Isn’t the statement true === false always false? How can that be less than null? if someone could explain what exactly is supposed to be accomplished here, I’d really appreciate it.

Thanks in advance.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / New Game design By My Best Friend

Originally posted by Draco18s:

Sounds like Five Minutes to Kill Yourself

It basically is.

Elyzius is also right about it not being a “strategy” game by any real industry standard.

That being said: the music’s pretty cheesy. The sound effects (especially the electricity one) sound very canned, and are obtrusive enough to be distracting. The puzzles are pretty simple, and the majority of the challenge comes from the avatar’s way-too-slow horizontal speed. I realize he’s “walking”, but then a better animation should have been chosen. Permanent walking isn’t something that generally goes well with platformers like this, in my opinion. The jump is a bit strong. There’s horizontal skid when the left/right buttons are released. There’s no jump animation, either, which makes it look kinda cheesy.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Last Jungle In Sector 17 [Looking for some gameplay feedback]

 
Flag Post

Topic: Serious Discussion / islam- what is it about? (locked)

You mean other than the myriad reasons why any random person would “hate” on any foreign idealogy? Especially one of a religious/superstitious type?

I don’t subscribe to any particular religion, however you might not be giving enough credence to the motivating power of the primitive “us vs. them” instinct of human beings. The Catholic Church, one of the wealthiest, largest, most powerful entities in the history of human civilization, is founded on the unquestionable “fact” that God sent/became his son, who then told things how they “really” are, before dying on the cross and descending to hell, forever absolving humanity of its sins (if only they ask in earnest), and rising three days later to sit at the right hand of God the father. Wars have been fought in the name of that idea. Children sent to their deaths. “Heretics” slaughtered. Countries conquered. Nazi gold smuggled to safety (look it up). Kings crowned. Rulers removed. Entire nations of people live their lives according to the rules mandated by the Catholic Church, and have been doing so for (approximately—factoring Nicea) 200 decades. 2,000 years of prayers, Our Fathers, and “relics”.

If what Islam says is true, that Jesus was just a guy who had some “nice ideas”, it throws all of that in the dirt. It means that both the Catholic Church, supposedly ordained by Christ himself through the apostle Peter, and Protestantism, the framework of most Western society, are shams that have, in the big picture, done nothing in the last 2,000 years except lead people astray and woefully misinform them as to God’s will.

If that wasn’t (one would assume) as upsetting to non-Muslims as it is, they might also be slightly perturbed by the idea that—world formed ~14,000 B.C.E. and Islam revealed to Mohammed ~610 C.E.—they have been living according to a vastly incomplete and inaccurate representation of God’s will, and that God has allowed people to completely and utterly “get it wrong” for over 14,000 years. Or in other words: that the traditions and beliefs they hold most dear, the ones that those people define themselves by, are wrong. And that God let it happen.

People don’t like being wrong.

 

Topic: Serious Discussion / Arab Awakening Middle East Borders

This post has been removed by an administrator or moderator
 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Does a turn-based multiplayer Flash game need a server

Boom: http://www.indieflashblog.com/how-to-create-an-asynchronous-multiplayer-game.html :)

Seems like what you’re needing. Hope that helps

 
Flag Post

Topic: The Arts / I made two more double meaning drawings, i hope you like it :-)

Very impressive :) Great job

 
Flag Post

Topic: Serious Discussion / Searching Beat-testers

And they’ve got 57 forum posts (not counting this one) as well. While that’s not a great many, it’s enough that one would think they’d learned the basic ins and outs by now…

 
Flag Post

Topic: Kongregate / Gamepads/Joysticks?

I can also attest to Joy2Key. It does have a bit of a curve as far as mapping goes, but there is more than enough documentation online to make it easy. Can’t speak for TGC, but J2K has profiles, so I have permanent profiles for my SNES emulator, my PS1 emulator, and others. That way when I start my PS1 emulator, I load J2K as well, single click the PS1 mapping profile, and everything’s done. Boom, I’m playing. I even have one that allows me to basically surf the web and use my computer from the couch, all with my xbox controller. It’s very possible and wouldn’t in any way be against the ToS.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Programming / Platformers, x, y, and stuff like that

Under Graphics, maybe? Display object? The coordinates themselves are just properties of an object, e.g. for(i=0; object.x > i; … ) and so forth

 
Flag Post

Topic: Kongregate / ADMIN TOM IS NONEPROFESSIONAL

Lol, dayum… >_>

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Last Jungle In Sector 17 [Looking for some gameplay feedback]

Originally posted by qwerberberber:
Originally posted by FinalStrife7:
Originally posted by qwerberberber:
Originally posted by yodalr2:

what are you talking about all ur previous posts are about me reposting? Nothing constructive, and now ur just flaming, nothing constructive either.

Dude, pretty sure he linked you your other thread in which he had like a huge wall of text.

I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t entertaining the possibility that this is all just an incredibly elaborate, well-executed attempt to troll…

In which case, they totally got me. Where’s Ashton? I know he’s here somewhere.

I dont think it is, I saw thier game on /r/gamedev

Unless that too is just all part of the effort to lend it even more legitimacy…. >_>

These guys could very well be masterminds.

 
Flag Post

Topic: General Gaming / elder scrolls online

Originally posted by kail5:

when will elder scrolls online come out.

Probably on its release date.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Last Jungle In Sector 17 [Looking for some gameplay feedback]

Originally posted by qwerberberber:
Originally posted by yodalr2:

what are you talking about all ur previous posts are about me reposting? Nothing constructive, and now ur just flaming, nothing constructive either.

Dude, pretty sure he linked you your other thread in which he had like a huge wall of text.

I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t entertaining the possibility that this is all just an incredibly elaborate, well-executed attempt to troll…

In which case, they totally got me. Where’s Ashton? I know he’s here somewhere.

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Hiring for a game named CYDEST

Originally posted by Draco18s:
Originally posted by AlexK124:

OKAY, LISTEN HERE, IF YOU WANT MONEY..Then you can leave..

And everyone stops reading.

I however decided to keep reading.

You have to kill cyborgs and robots who will attack you. You have 100health on every match, a match lasts 8minutes. If you survive then you will get the points.

Generic idea of genericness. Also, 8 minutes? How did you decide this? Usually things like that are decided as part of balance testing, finding that point where the game is short enough to be fun, but long enough to be challenging.

Also you will have a shop. In shop you can buy guns swords and lifepacks… Or a explodership.

HOLY SHIT, NEW IDE—oh, right. It’s a fucking shop. What the hell did you think a shop would sell in a shooting game? Bananas!?

The membership WILL give you money.

So for $N I get a ticket that gives me $N*Y in return? If Y is > 1, then it’s just a “spend money to make money” thing and you might as well just give people more money. If Y < 1, then it’s a “spend money to do nothing” thing, and you might as well not have it, because people will not buy it.

Oh and also, you have to login or register to play the game

Hurr.

I shall be the owner, and also.. You guys can be just admins. You guys fix the bugs and stuff like that.

Durr.

Also you should make a settings panel for me, because then i can change settings also.

HURR.

By the way, make a message box for me, the owner. That’s because if i want you guys to make a new update or a new weapon.

DURR.

Oh yeah and also there should be levels

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Hiring for a game named CYDEST

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Hiring for a game named CYDEST

Originally posted by truefire:

lmfao

 
Flag Post

Topic: Game Design / Does a turn-based multiplayer Flash game need a server

Kinda depends what you mean. It’s a bit hard to make out. So far as I know, two separate instances of a flash game cannot directly communicate with each other, since obviously that would create huge security risks.

It seems you’re talking more like those people who play chess by mail, or by forum post. Black moves his piece and sends the move. White moves black’s piece on his own board, moves his piece, and sends HIS move back to black. Rinse. Repeat. If that’s what you mean, then it could totally happen, obviously. P1 could move, which would then display a hash. P1 copies the hash, sends it via whatever method they choose. P2 inputs the hash, the game makes the appropriate adjustments, and then P2 does the whole process.